News

Canada Makes, Edmit & MDA team up for innovative space application parts

Canada Makes, Edmit Industries Inc. of Chateauguay Quebec and MacDonald, Dettwiler and Associates Ltd. (MDA) of Ste-Anne-de-Bellevue Quebec partnered to build 3D printed Titanium parts for an innovative graphite strut structure for flight application. This is another Additive Manufacturing (AM) project that demonstrates how this technology offers solutions not straightforwardly feasible through conventional manufacturing means. Canada Makes enabled, with funding through its Metal Additive Demonstration program, the manufacturing development and build of the Titanium 3D printed parts at Edmit.

“This is yet another example of how additive manufacturing is transforming how satellite parts are being manufactured” says Joanna Boshouwers, MDA’s Vice President and General Manager. “The parts were 3D printed by Edmit, and then tested by MDA to the extreme temperatures of space and the punishing vibration environment of a launch. The Canada Makes program played a key role in accelerating the adoption of AM for this space application, which will lead increase use of this AM technology going forward.”

“One of the primary goals of the Canada Makes program is to promote the Canadian additive manufacturing industry, and this successful project will go a long way to encourage increased use of this technology,” said Frank Defalco, Manager Canada Makes. “Additive manufacturing is a disruptive technology, and this project is testimony of that fact, and we are excited about the opportunities this solution provides to other companies.”

MDA-Edmit-2

3D Printed Titanium Bracket and Hub for a Satellite Graphite Strut Structure

The parts are used in the assembly of a lightweight antenna graphite spaceframe, optimized for strength, stiffness, thermal performance and mass.

Various satellite manufacturers are using additive manufacturing to reduce cost and schedule required to build spacecraft parts. Space System Loral (SSL), a subsidiary of MDA, recently announced they also started to incorporate the technology into their satellite structures.

Although 3D printing offers new possibilities in the manufacture of satellites, the transition from conventional manufacturing to this new AM approach can be somewhat challenging and expensive. It is therefore important to adopt this technology in the appropriate circumstances in order to get the full benefit.

The Metal Additive Manufacturing Demonstration Program is delivered by Canada Makes through funding by NRC-IRAP. The program is designed to help Canadian industries increase awareness and assist in understanding the advantages of the metal additive manufacturing (AM) technology. Canada Makes works with a group of AM experts who provide participating companies guidance of the advantages and business opportunities in terms of cost savings and efficiencies of AM.

About MDA
MDA is a global communications and information company providing operational solutions to commercial and government organizations worldwide.

MDA’s business is focused on markets and customers with strong repeat business potential, primarily in the Communications sector and the Surveillance and Intelligence sector. In addition, the Company conducts a significant amount of advanced technology development.

MDA’s established global customer base is served by more than 4,800 employees operating from 15 locations in the United States, Canada, and internationally. www.mdacorporation.com

About Edmit
A small to medium size company that specializes in the manufacturing of high-end precision components and assemblies. As Innovators and researchers, EDMIT provides leading edge and innovative methods and concepts. With more than 35 years of expertise, Edmit Inc. specializes in metal additive manufacturing (3D printing) of precision metal parts for the aerospace, space and medical industries and have been a key partner for research and development projects for space application for the past five years. edmitinc.com

About Canada Makes
A Canadian Manufacturers & Exporters (CME) initiative, Canada Makes is a network of private, public, academic, and non-profit entities dedicated to promoting the adoption and development of additive manufacturing in Canada. For more information on Canada Makes, please visit www.canadamakes.ca or contact Frank Defalco at frank.defalco@cme-mec.ca

 

P&G and AMM partner with Canada Makes’ Metal Additive Demonstration Program

Procter & Gamble Belleville Plant partnered with Additive Metal Manufacturing Inc. (AMM) and Canada Makes to explore building new customized parts using additive manufacturing (AM). The project was funded through Canada Makes’ Metal Additive Demonstration Program.

“Parts can be very difficult even impossible to make with traditional subtractive machining processes,” said Haixia Jin, FullSizeRenderP&G Engineering Technical Manager. “Metal 3D printing offers an exciting alternative to commercial off-the-shelf parts that cannot achieve complicated design requirements or internal cavity geometry. Even in cases where commercial customization is available and able, it usually comes with significant additional cost or an unbearable long lead-time.”

The example piece of work is printed to serve the combined purposes to deliver fluid to designated locations with the four extended legs while minimizing disturbance to the flow that it merges in. The vast metallurgy choices also provide a wide spectrum of chemical/environmental resistance. This illustrated part was printed in Stainless Steel taking advantage of its good anti-corrosion performance.

“AMM is delighted to be partnering with P&G and Canada Makes in assisting P&G introduce 3D METAL printing into their supply chain,” said Norman Holesh, President AMM. “P&G embarked on this journey with the full understanding that to be successful, the technology must be embraced as early as possible in the design stage. This technology is neither an alternative to subtractive manufacturing nor a replacement for it but an addition to the entire manufacturing process and allows for previously unthinkable designs and a dramatic reduction in lead times.”

IMG_6928“Design rules have changed and AMM works with its customers to help them understand and embrace these changes and take full advantage of design freedom,” added Holesh

“Designing and building complex parts as well as the lead-time saved are two big advantages that AM offers users of the technology. This project certainly was an excellent example offered through Canada Makes’ Metal Additive Demonstration Program,” stated Frank Defalco Manager Canada Makes. “Canada Makes will continue to partner with Canadian companies looking to the advantages offered by having additive manufacturing as a powerful new option in creating parts previously unfeasible.”

About AMM

Advanced Manufacturing Canada
Additive Metal Manufacturing Inc. is a full-service 3D METAL printing bureau located in Toronto and assists its customers understand the additive journey from design all the way to finished printed component parts. AMM is a progressive, productive and respected leader providing integrated and advanced manufacturing technology solutions within the emerging market for AM ensuring their industrial partners have the best opportunity to excel and Take Back Manufacturing for Canada. AMM is certified with both ISO 9001 and for Controlled Goods. www.additivemet.com

About Procter & Gamble Belleville Plant
Opened in 1975, the Belleville, Ontario site now produces Always and Olay products for North America and the globe.

  • In 1984, the Belleville site started manufacturing Always feminine care products
  • The site currently manufactures the entire line of Always products, including pads, liners, Always Infinity and Always Discreet, as well as Olay Daily Facials
  • Since 2010, the site has received a prestigious manufacturing excellence award, the highest recognition among P&G manufacturing facilities

To celebrate their 40th anniversary, the site set a Guinness World Record for the largest game of “Follow the Leader” in the world.

The Metal Additive Manufacturing Demonstration Program is funded by NRC-IRAP and is designed to help Canadian industries increase awareness and assist in understanding the advantages of the metal additive manufacturing (AM) technology. Canada Makes works with a group of AM experts who provide participating companies guidance of the advantages and business opportunities in terms of cost savings and efficiencies of AM.

About Canada Makes
A Canadian Manufacturers & Exporters (CME) initiative, Canada Makes is a network of private, public, academic, and non-profit entities dedicated to promoting the adoption and development of additive manufacturing in Canada. For more information on Canada Makes, please visit www.canadamakes.ca

Media contact:
Frank Defalco at frank.defalco@cme-mec.ca

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Canada Makes releases the Metal Additive Design Guide

A new introductory design guide for metal 3D printing is now available.

OTTAWA – Canada Makes is proud to announce the launch of the Metal Additive Design Guide and invites you to explore this great new tool. The Guide was developed to assist companies interested in trying metal additive manufacturing (AM). Following the same format as the Metal Additive Process Guide, the Metal Additive Design Guide is once again a free service that introduces concepts needed when designing for additive manufacturing (DfAD).Metal Additive Design Guide

“The Metal Additive Design Guide is easy to use, interactive, offering useful information for newcomers to this technology,” said Frank Defalco, Manager Canada Makes. “Its primary function is to help guide Canadian SMEs looking at metal AM and how it might be added to their process. It’s a great educational resource bringing great value to users and it’s just plain cool.”

Simple, yet crucial questions like, “how big can my parts be” or, “what materials can I use” are answered in this interactive app. The Guide is not designed for the experienced metal AM user but rather someone looking for quick and straightforward answers regarding DfAM.

Screen-guide

“Canada Makes’ goal is to assist Canadian industry in adopting additive manufacturing and the Metal Additive Metal Additive Process GuideDesign Guide continues in that vain where the Metal Additive Process Guide left off,” added Defalco.

Time saving is one of the major advantage in adopting AM processes versus traditional manufacturing. Through this free resource SMEs can receive quick answers to certain concepts about metal additive. The Guide will help speed up Canada’s manufacturing sector in understanding the capabilities of metal AM. This knowledge should expand AM adoption and invigorate Canada’s burgeoning AM supply chain, growing Canada’s competitiveness.

Canada Makes would like to state how greatly it appreciates the assistance to all those that made the Metal Additive Process Guide possible.

Altair Canada Mazak
Autodesk Microfabrica
Prof. Mike Ashby, Cambridge University MIT Aero/Astro
Burloak Technologies Moog Inc
Boothroyd Dewhurst Reaction Engines
Cranfield University Renishaw
Dassault Systemes Robarts Research Institute
ExOne Senvol
FusiA solidThinking
GE Aviation U.S. Navy ManTech Navy
Gradientspace Metalworking Canter/Cocurrent
HiETA Technologies Corporation
Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory

The Metal Additive Design Guide was funded through the National Research Council Canada Industrial Research Assistance Program in accordance with the Metal Additive Demonstration Program.

Canada Makes is looking forward to partnering once again with NRC-IRAP and deliver the Metal AM Demonstration Program. The program plans to continue to expand the AM knowledge base for Canada’s manufacturing sector and work with all stakeholders to grow the sector.

The Metal Additive Manufacturing Demonstration Program is delivered by Canada Makes through funding by NRC-IRAP. The program is designed to help Canadian industries increase awareness and assist in understanding the advantages of the metal additive manufacturing (AM) technology. Canada Makes works with a group of AM experts who provide participating companies guidance of the advantages and business opportunities in terms of cost savings and efficiencies of AM.

About Canada Makes
A Canadian Manufacturers & Exporters (CME) initiative, Canada Makes is a network of private, public, academic, and non-profit entities dedicated to promoting the adoption and development of additive manufacturing in Canada. For more information on Canada Makes, please visit www.canadamakes.ca

Media contact:
Frank Defalco at frank.defalco@cme-mec.ca

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Canada Makes funds Shimifrez project with the Metal Additive Demonstration Program

Shimifrez expansion to create eight jobs at its new facility in Vaughan

Shimifrez Inc., a global leader in fabricating precision photo chemically etched and electroformed of micro metal components, announces the kick off of a $750K expansion that will create eight additional jobs at its new facility in Vaughan, Ontario.

“Shimifrez is committed to a culture of continuous improvement. As 9100 certification illustrates our ongoing efforts to improve in all areas of our business, we already observe stringent quality standards since we supply highly regulated industries such as medical and micro electronics, demonstrating our commitment to quality,” said Hassan Nojoumi, President of Shimifrez Inc.

Canada Makes helped fund, through its Metal Additive Demonstration Program, the photo electroforming of copper parts, an additive process that can control the tolerances to +/1um on the feature and thickness of the parts.

“The Metal Additive Demonstration Program goal is to develop a world-class supply chain of companies, Canada Makes is pleased to see Shimifrez expanding its operations to help achieve the goal,” said Frank Defalco, Manager Canada Makes.

Nojoumi added, “Canada Makes assistance helped Shimifrez take a big step in developing our capabilities to deliver rapid-response service for micro components to several precision industries such as the aerospace/satellite, Medical, Automotive, Telecommunications and micro- electronics sectors.”

Electroforming is a fabrication process through which a highly accurate negative replica is produced from a mandrel or master surface. It also stands out in terms of high repeat-ability and complex thin metal products. The highly resolution of the conductive patterned substrate allows finer geometries, tighter tolerances and superior edge definition.

Precision photochemical etching is a cost effective method for producing complex flat metal parts for prototyping and quantity production. Photo Chemical Etching has eliminated the cost of hard tooling and has enabled a manufacturing process accurately and much faster turn-around with no deformation and burrs.

“We recognized that there’s a major market gap, for accurate, flexible and cost effective thin metal components and services, new advanced technologies and investments in state-of-the-art capital equipment are lowering production costs, increasing productivity and allowing for the creation of new innovative products” said Nojoumi.

The fastest response time and lowest photo tooling costs make photo chemical machining and electroforming ideal for both prototyping and medium / large production quantities. Instead of stamping, or laser cutting Photo Etching produces highly accurate and identical components for small and large batches.

The demand now exists for relatively thin between 0.0005” (0.01mm) to 0.040” (1 mm), complex design and intricate metal components at an economical price. Shimifrez is capable of making parts from 0.02X0.02” (2X2mm) and feature size of less than 15 microns.

About Shimifrez Inc.
With over 35 of experience in the field of micro metal fabrication, Shimifrez’s activities in photo chemical etching and electro-forming is far reaching and can include creating critical components for satellites and instrumentation’s to micro meshes/grids and super fine sieves, lead frames, ultra micro metal parts, shadow and sputtering masks, fluidic channels, reticles, shims, targets, RFI/EMI/ESD board level shielding, heat sinks, Bipolar plates and consumer wearable technologies. Components can be manufactured in stainless steels, nickel alloys, beryllium copper, Metglas, Hastelloy, phosphorous bronze, kovar, inconel, DCB substrates and aluminum alloys to name a few. www.shimifrez.com

The Metal Additive Manufacturing Demonstration Program is funding by NRC-IRAP and is designed to help Canadian industries increase awareness and assist in understanding the advantages of the metal additive manufacturing (AM) technology. Canada Makes works with a group of AM experts who provide participating companies guidance of the advantages and business opportunities in terms of cost savings and efficiencies of AM.

About Canada Makes
A Canadian Manufacturers & Exporters (CME) initiative, Canada Makes is a network of private, public, academic, and non-profit entities dedicated to promoting the adoption and development of additive manufacturing in Canada. For more information on Canada Makes, please visit www.canadamakes.ca

Media contact:
Frank Defalco at frank.defalco@cme-mec.ca

Taking the Lead in Additive Manufacturing presented by Réseau Québec-3D & Canada Makes

Taking the Lead in Additive ManufacturingOn May 31, 2017 come and see an impressive lineup of Canadian and international additive manufacturing experts and more than 300 participants with 20 exhibitors for the third edition of Réseau Québec-3D’s annual conference in collaboration with Canada Makes.

The third conference will be held in the Montreal suburb of Boucherville with the theme: “Taking the Lead in Additive Manufacturing”.

The event offers the opportunity to attend talks by international presenters including GE Additive, Materialise, Additive Industries and Michelin, as well as Canadian leaders in additive manufacturing.

Don’t miss this opportunity to network with Canadian and international business leaders who have demonstrated expertise throughout the additive manufacturing supply chain and to help position Québec and Canada as leaders in this flourishing industry.

Date:
May 31, 2017

Location:
Hôtel Mortagne
1228, rue Nobel, Boucherville, QC J4B 5H1

Cost:

Until April 30, 2017 After April 30, 2017
Members* $200 $250
Non-members $250 $300

*Réseau Québec-3D, Canada Makes, PRIMA Québec, and CRITM members can take advantage of the member registration fee.

REGISTER NOW!
Member registration form
Non-member registration form

INTERESTED IN BECOMING AN EVENT PARTNER?
Contact Cristina Marques to learn more about the many benefits that come with these partnership levels: Prestige (1); Business (2); Networking (1) or Collaborative (4)!
INTERESTED IN PARTICIPATING IN THE EXHIBITORS FAIR?
Contact Cristina Marques right away to reserve your space!

Accommodations:
Hôtel Mortagne offers participants a special rate of $165 per night. To obtain this rate, mention the confirmation number 19943 or indicate you are attending the Annual Réseau Québec-3D Conference. The deadline to take advantage of this rate is May 12, 2017.
To reserve: 1-450-655-9966 or toll free: 1-877-655-9966.

For more information:
Marie-Eve Drouin
1-418-659-1550 / 1-800-667-2386, ext. 2499
info@reseauquebec3d.com

 logos EN

EMV vehicle goes metal additive with Canada Makes & Precision ADM

Battery box cap

Battery box cap

Additive manufacturing is changing how we build things and electric vehicles in how we go places. For these reasons they are often referred to as ‘disruptive technologies’ so combining them is sure to offer some interesting possibilities. This recently happened when Canada Makes, Precision ADM, and Electra Meccanica Vehicles (EMV) partnered on an additive manufactured battery box end cap for an electric automobile.

“The Metal Additive Manufacturing Demonstration Program allowed EMV to start exploring metal additive manufacturing capabilities and I’m very excited to expand our working relationship with additive manufacturing technologies,” said Jerry Kroll CEO of EMV.

The Battery box cap part was manufactured using titanium (Ti64ELI) on Precision ADM’s EOS M290.  “We thought titanium would be the best material for its strength to weight ratio,” said Martin Petrak, CEO and President Precision ADM. “It allowed a reduction of the wall thickness by half therefore reducing the weight while maintaining the parts strength and stiffness.”

“The Part was delivered to spec and installed on a prototype in less than two weeks,” stated Frank Defalco, Manager Canada Makes. “This project highlights two of the main appeals in adopting additive manufacturing. The time saved receiving a working metal prototype, which speeds up new products to market, and significant weight savings of parts when designed for additive manufacturing (DfAM).”

“Using our advanced training in DfAM from EOS, we are able to use these design rules to help clients save on the build times and material cost,” added Petrak. “Designing for Metal AM is new tool in the tool box for Advanced Digital Manufacturing, that more and more companies are now investing in.”

Canada Makes’ Metal Additive Manufacturing Demonstration program recently completed its third round of funding and is pleased to report that over 50 Canadian companies participated last year. A new round of funding is currently being negotiated for the coming fiscal year.

The Metal Additive Manufacturing Demonstration Program is funding by NRC-IRAP and is designed to help Canadian industries increase awareness and assist in understanding the advantages of the metal additive manufacturing (AM) technology. Canada Makes works with a group of AM experts who provide participating companies guidance of the advantages and business opportunities in terms of cost savings and efficiencies of AM.

About Electra Meccanica Vehicles Corp.
Electra Meccanica strives to be the driving force behind sustainable transport by creating the compelling mass market, all-electric SOLO. The vehicle will make the urban commute more efficient, cost-effective and environmentally friendly. The SOLO’s futuristic design is powered by a 16.1 kWhs lithium ion battery and the drive system is tuned for higher speed and mobility. With a range of 160kms (100 miles), and a top speed of 130kms/h (80 mph), the SOLO delivers superior performance and spirited driving. electrameccanica.com

About Precision ADM
Precision ADM is a contract engineering and manufacturing solutions provider that uses additive manufacturing (3D Printing) as a core technology. Precision ADM has created a full Advanced Digital Manufacturing hub from Design to Engineering, to Manufacturing and finishing.  Complimented by multi-axis machining capability, PADM identifies, develops, and manufactures high value components and device applications for the medical, aerospace, energy and industrial sectors. PADM is headquartered in Winnipeg, Manitoba, Canada. www.precisionadm.com

About Canada Makes
A Canadian Manufacturers & Exporters (CME) initiative, Canada Makes is a network of private, public, academic, and non-profit entities dedicated to promoting the adoption and development of additive manufacturing in Canada. For more information on Canada Makes, please visit www.canadamakes.ca

Media contact:
Frank Defalco at frank.defalco@cme-mec.ca

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Budget 2017 supports industry-led advanced manufacturing super cluster

(OTTAWA) – Canadian Manufacturers & Exporters, the voice of over 10,000 leading manufacturers and exporters, is encouraged by the commitment the Government of Canada has made to support and enhance the global competitiveness of advanced manufacturing through the strong commitment to innovation and skills training with Budget 2017.

“This is a budget that puts innovation where it belongs – as a driving force behind strategies for long-term growth in manufacturing and trade to build a better future for middle-class Canadians,” said CME President & CEO Dennis Darby upon his review of the Budget.

“Manufacturers are pleased to see government following through on our recommendation for an industry-led super cluster strategy that will focus efforts of the federal government to support advanced manufacturing and help Canadians companies to compete head-to-head in markets around the world.”

Darby added that Canadian manufacturers will be first in line to work with government to establish an advanced/digital manufacturing super cluster. “We expect government will work with manufacturers to get this cluster off the ground quickly, and the need is urgent as 36 per cent of our members identify the cost and risk of seeking new opportunities as the leading domestic barrier to achieving export success.”

In addition, Darby is encouraged by Budget 2017’s commitments to invest in a comprehensive skills training strategy to address skills gaps that are hurting the middle class and paralyzing job creation. He stated that a full one quarter of CME’s members are restricting production due to a shortage of skilled labour – with 40 percent of members experiencing labour shortages today.

“We know that Canada can’t afford to leave anyone out if we are going to fix our skills gap, as availability of skills is identified as the number one factor that influences manufacturers when they are deciding where to invest in Canada. We need to invest in our people, and give them the skills and tools that will build the kind of economy they need to take care of their families and be confident in the future. It’s encouraging that this budget backs up those words with action, and we look forward to being a fully engaged partner in the months ahead.”

CME 2017 Budget Analysis

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About CME
Since 1871, Canadian Manufacturers & Exporters has been helping manufacturers grow at home and thrive around the world. In 2016, CME released Industrie 2030 – a roadmap for doubling Canadian manufacturing activity by 2030. Our focus is to ensure the sector is dynamic, profitable, productive, innovative and growing. We aim to do this by strengthening the labour force, accelerating the adoption of advanced technology, supporting product commercialization, expanding marketplaces and, most importantly, ensuring a globally-competitive business environment. CME is a member-driven association that directly represents more than 2,500 leading companies who account for an estimated 82 per cent of manufacturing output and 90 per cent of Canada’s exports.
For more information, contact:
Jeff Blay
Canadian Manufacturers & Exporters
Tel: (289) 241-5114
jblay@enterprisecanada.com

Canada Makes, Fusia & MDA team up for space-bound part

Canada Makes, FusiA and MacDonald, Dettwiler and Associates Ltd. (MDA) partnered to build a part to be launched into to space later this year. Additive manufacturing projects like this highlight how the technology is rapidly changing the economics of space. Canada Makes helped with funding through its Metal Additive Demonstration program supported by NRC-IRAP, MDA designed the part and FusiA built it.

“We are accelerating our adoption of additive manufacturing for space,” says Joanna Boshouwers, MDA’s Vice President and General Manager. “The FusiA built part shown will be tested structurally in order to qualify the rest of the batch to fly in space. The support MDA received by Canada Makes’ program has proved to be valuable, allowing us to explore more complex parts produced with this technique.”

“Canada Makes primary goal is to reinforce Canada’s additive manufacturing supply chain and this project is a big step in that direction,” said Frank Defalco, Manager Canada Makes. “This is the third round we have partnered with NRC-IRAP on the Metal AM Demonstration Program, and we are very pleased that many others projects are also helping companies learn how to use additive manufacturing to innovate.”

MDA-Fusia-part

Spacecraft interface bracket for an antenna

The parts are spacecraft interface brackets for an antenna and been optimised for a flight project.

Various satellite manufacturers are using additive manufacturing to reduce the cost and time required to build spacecraft parts. Boeing recently announced they will begin incorporating the technology, another recent announcement from Poland that they will use 3D printing to develop the country’s first satellites.

3D printing offers new possibilities for manufacturers of satellites. The building of parts with additive manufacturing allows new capabilities not available using conventional manufacturing, although it can be expensive and difficult so it is crucial to use the technology correctly where it offers true benefits.

The Metal Additive Manufacturing Demonstration Program is delivered by Canada Makes through funding by NRC-IRAP. The program is designed to help Canadian industries increase awareness and assist in understanding the advantages of the metal additive manufacturing (AM) technology. Canada Makes works with a group of AM experts who provide participating companies guidance of the advantages and business opportunities in terms of cost savings and efficiencies of AM.

About MDA
MDA is a global communications and information company providing operational solutions to commercial and government organizations worldwide.

MDA’s business is focused on markets and customers with strong repeat business potential, primarily in the Communications sector and the Surveillance and Intelligence sector. In addition, the Company conducts a significant amount of advanced technology development.

MDA’s established global customer base is served by more than 4,800 employees operating from 15 locations in the United States, Canada, and internationally. www.mdacorporation.com

About FusiA
With more than 40 years of expertise, FusiA Impression 3D Metal Inc specializes in metal additive manufacturing (3D printing) of precision metal parts for the aerospace, space and defense and they have been a key partner for research and development projects of aeronautics for the past five years. www.fusia.fr

About Canada Makes
A Canadian Manufacturers & Exporters (CME) initiative,  Canada Makes is a network of private, public, academic, and non-profit entities dedicated to promoting the adoption and development of additive manufacturing in Canada. For more information on Canada Makes, please visit www.canadamakes.ca or contact Frank Defalco at frank.defalco@cme-mec.ca

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Calgary’s Cassidy Silbernagel repeats as winner of Design for Additive Manufacturing Challenge 2017

Cassidy

Cassidy Silbernagel

Last month Canada Makes reported on the finalists for the Additive World Design for Additive Manufacturing Challenge 2017 and we are pleased to announce that Cassidy Silbernagel once again won in the students’ category.

“I’m honoured to be selected a second time as the winner in the student category,” said Silbernagel. “This  competition offered the opportunity to show that additive manufacturing (AM) can take old designs, such as a carburetor, and make them new again with added benefit and features like part reduction, decreased size and weight, and improved performance.”

On Wednesday March 15, the Jury announced the two winners of the Additive World Design for Additive Manufacturing Challenge 2017. From a group of 76 contestants, both professionals and students, 3 finalists were selected per category. The two winners selected best achieved the goal of making a new design or redesign an existing product for additive manufacturing.

Sealer Arm

Lareka Confectionery Equipment’s Sealer Arm

The ‘Chocolate Shock Prevention Team’ of Lareka Confectionery Equipment from The Netherlands won in the professionals’ category with their redesigned ‘Sealer Arm’ for a chocolate bar packaging line. The redesigned and 3D printed sealer arm successfully combined a substantial increase in the quality of chocolate packaging because of better temperature regulation with a reduction of 50 parts.

Cassidy Silbernagel, representing the University of Nottingham, won with redesigned carburetor including integrated moving parts, floats, lightweight internal lattice structures and optimized design to reduce the number of support structures.

Cassidy said, “software like the University’s FLatt Pack for lattice generation is speeding up the workflow from idea to creation is becoming easier and quicker and greatly decreases development time for new products. The use of these new software options is crucial to new AM design creation.”

Cassidy Silbernagel's redesigned carburetor

Cassidy Silbernagel’s redesigned carburetor

“Although AM is an amazing technology,” stated Cassidy. “It isn’t a magic hammer that solves all manufacturing needs. It is just one of many tools in a designer’s tool chest that can be utilized, but first designers need to know that they have this tool, and they need to know how to use it. I’m happy to see that this competition along with organizations like Canada Makes and Additive Industries are helping teach designers this fact, and I’m proud to also aid in this educational goal.”

Canada Makes salutes the winners and all contestants. Challenges like Design for Additive Manufacturing Challenge helps showcase the vast potential of Additive Manufacturing for industry.

A graduate of Mechanical Engineering at the University of Calgary, Cassidy is in the UK currently pursuing a PhD at the University of Nottingham. He is researching the possibility of using AM in electric motors, specifically using AM to create coils/windings using a conductive metal like copper or aluminum and an insulating material like ceramic.

Last years’ winning design was an innovative electric motor casing to fit into an existing crankshaft case of a regular motorcycle enabling electrification. Silbernagel’s design reduced eight parts to one lightweight component and integrated room for heat transfer and well-rounded wiring tunnels.

Motor casing

Cassidy’s 2016 winning design Electric motor casing

For this years’ contest designers were asked to tailor their designs, to eliminate manufacturing difficulties, reduce the number of parts, minimize assembly or lower logistics costs, often combined. Designs were submitted from all over the world including the US, the Netherlands, Germany, UK, Spain, India, Russia and Italy representing different sectors, advanced food processing, the aeronautics industry, automotive as well as high-tech.

About Design for Additive Manufacturing Challenge
In order to grow the number of examples and inspire many other industries to develop dedicated applications for industrial 3D printing, Additive Industries has launched the Additive World Design for Additive Manufacturing Challenge. Competing in two categories, both professionals and students were encouraged to redesign an existing conventional part of a machine or product for 3D printing.

Partners in the Design for Additive Manufacturing Challenge are leading CAE technology provider (e.g. Topology Optimization) – Altair Engineering and consumer 3D printer manufacturer Ultimaker. Contestants are to be supported by Additive Industries’ AddLab team in topology optimisation during the design process. Winners in both categories take home the latest Ultimaker 2+ 3D printer and Autodesk’s NetFabb software. All finalists receive a licence of Altair’s Inspire software and Autodesk Fusion 360 and award winning designs will be printed in metal by AddLab.

About Canada Makes

Canada Makes is a network of private, public, academic, and non-profit entities dedicated to promoting the adoption and development of additive manufacturing in Canada. For more information on Canada Makes, please visit www.canadamakes.ca or contact Frank Defalco at frank.defalco@cme-mec.ca

 

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LLNL researchers first to 3D print aerospace-grade carbon fiber composites

Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) researchers have become the first to 3D print aerospace-grade carbon fiber composites, opening the door to greater control and optimization of the lightweight, yet stronger than steel material.

The research, published by the journal Scientific Reports online on March 6, represents a “significant advance” in the development of micro-extrusion 3D printing techniques for carbon fiber, the authors reported.

“The mantra is ‘if you could make everything out of carbon fiber, you would’ — it’s potentially the ultimate material,” explained Jim Lewicki, principal investigator and the paper’s lead author. “It’s been waiting in the wings for years because it’s so difficult to make in complex shapes. But with 3D printing, you could potentially make anything out of carbon fiber.”

3D

A carbon fiber composite ink extrudes from a customized direct ink writing (DIW) 3D printer, eventually building part of a rocket nozzle.

Carbon fiber is a lightweight, yet stiff and strong material with a high resistance to temperature, making the composite material popular in the aerospace, defense and automotive industries, and sports such as surfing and motorcycle racing.

Carbon fiber composites are typically fabricated one of two ways — by physically winding the filaments around a mandrel, or weaving the fibers together like a wicker basket, resulting in finished products that are limited to either flat or cylindrical shapes, Lewicki said. Fabricators also tend to overcompensate with material due to performance concerns, making the parts heavier, costlier and more wasteful than necessary.

However, LLNL researchers reported printing several complex 3D structures through a modified Direct Ink Writing (DIW) 3D printing process. Lewicki and his team also developed and patented a new chemistry that can cure the material in seconds instead of hours, and used the Lab’s high performance computing capabilities to develop accurate models of the flow of carbon fiber filaments.

“How we got past the clogging was through simulation,” Lewicki said. “This has been successful in large part because of the computational models.”

Computational modeling was performed on LLNL’s supercomputers by a team of engineers who needed to simulate thousands of carbon fibers as they emerged from the ink nozzle to find out how to best align them during the process.

“We developed a numerical code to simulate a non-Newtonian liquid polymer resin with a dispersion of carbon fibers. With this code, we can simulate evolution of the fiber orientations in 3D under different printing conditions,” said fluid analyst Yuliya Kanarska. “We were able to find the optimal fiber length and optimal performance, but it’s still a work in progress. Ongoing efforts are related to achieving even better alignment of the fibers by applying magnetic forces to stabilize them.”

The ability to 3D print offers new degrees of freedom for carbon fiber, researchers said, enabling them to have control over the parts’ mesostructure. The material also is conductive, allowing for directed thermal channeling within a structure. The resultant material, the researchers said, could be used to make high-performance airplane wings, satellite components that are insulated on one side and don’t need to be rotated in space, or wearables that can draw heat from the body but don’t allow it in.

“A big breakthrough for this technology is the development of custom carbon fiber-filled inks with thermoset matrix materials,” said materials and advanced manufacturing researcher Eric Duoss. “For example, epoxy and cyanate ester are carefully designed for our printing process, yet also provide enhanced mechanical and thermal performance compared to thermoplastic counterparts that are found in some commercially available carbon fiber 3D printing technologies, such as nylon and ABS (a common thermoplastic). This advance will enable a broad range of applications in aerospace, transportation and defense.”

The direct ink writing process also makes it possible to print parts with all the carbon fibers going the same direction within the microstructures, allowing them to outperform similar materials created with other methods done with random alignment. Through this process, researchers said they’re able to use two-thirds less carbon fiber and get the same material properties from the finished part… more

SOURCE – Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory

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