News

Ottawa Symphony Orchestra and Canada Makes Announce the Winner of the National 3D Printed Musical Instrument Challenge

Ottawa, 14 June, 2018 – Ottawa Symphony Orchestra and Canada Makes are pleased to announce Robert Hunter as the winner of the National 3D Printed Musical Instrument Challenge for his design for clarinet and brace which improve the ergonomics of the instrument by redistributing the weight of the instrument to larger muscle groups compared to traditional instruments. The award will be presented to Robert Hunter in person at Ottawa Symphony’s Open House event on Thursday, June 14th between 5-7pm at Dominion Chalmers (355 Cooper St.) in Ottawa.

“I was interested in this competition because of my combined background in biomedical engineering including biomechanics, 3D CAD design, and music. I used to play clarinet a lot in high school, and when I would practice for long periods my right thumb would become sore from supporting the weight of the instrument. So when I read about this competition, this problem immediately sprang to mind for something I could try and solve.” – Robert Hunter


The National 3D Printed Musical Instrument Challenge asked participants to improve or design an ergonomically optimized musical instrument that leverages the power of 3D printing (metal or polymer) for its fabrication, while remaining cost-effective. The designers were encouraged to consider how they could contribute to solving the epidemic of performance related injuries among professional musicians and music students by addressing root causes of the issue insofar as it relates to instrument design.

“Hunter’s design directly addresses an ergonomic injury risk to the musician and his proposal included an assessment of both playing aesthetic and technical demands. Bravo!” – Dr. John Chong.

“While music lifts the soul, many musicians – professionals and amateurs alike – struggle to perform due to injury. This challenge was an invitation to designers to employ new technology to the benefit of musician’s health. We were so pleased with all the creative ideas we received, and specifically, to award the KUN Prize to Robert Hunter.”– Alain Trudel

Applicants represented regions across Canada, a variety of levels of design experience and wide-ranging innovative solutions to common health problems among musicians. The submissions were evaluated by a panel of eight adjudicators with equal weighting between disciplines of 3D printing, music performance, and musicians’ health.

As the winner, Robert Hunter will receive the KUN Prize, valued at over $35k, which includes a fabrication and fitting budget, a 5min piece of music commissioned for the instrument, performance of the instrument at the Ottawa Symphony Orchestra’s 3D StringTheory concert on November 4th, and a $5k cash prize. The KUN Prize is sponsored by Marina Kun, President of KUN Shoulder Rests Inc., and fabrication is sponsored by Precision ADM and Axis Prototype Inc.

List of Adjudicators
Dr. John Chong, Medical Director of the Musicians’ Clinic of Canada
Judith Robitaille, musicians’ occupational therapist and professor at Université de Sherbrooke
David Saint John, Director of Innovation at Linamar Corporation
Gilles Desharnais, President of Axis Prototypes Inc.
Alain Trudel, Music Director of Ottawa Symphony Orchestra
Mary-Elizabeth Brown, Bielak-Hartman Concertmaster Chair of Ottawa Symphony Orchestra
Ben Glossop, Principal Bassoonist of Ottawa Symphony Orchestra
Travis Mandel, Principal Trumpet of Ottawa Symphony Orchestra

About the 3D StringTheory Project:

3D StringTheory asks:
What new instruments and sounds can we create using today’s newest technologies?

To explore the new creative possibilities that technology brings to music, the Ottawa Symphony Orchestra has commissioned Ottawa violin maker Charline Dequincey and the Industrial Technology Centre in Winnipeg to create original 3D-printed string instruments. Montreal-born composer Harry Stafylakis will write an original piece of music inspired by these new sounds. The Ottawa Symphony Orchestra will present the final product of these collective efforts in a live performance of Stafylakis’ piece, featuring the new instruments on November 4th, 2018.

The project will also feature public competitions involving instrument making and design challenges for youth, university students, and professionals. The 3D Printed Musical Instrument Challenge is the first competition to be announced.

The full process of creating the 3D-printed string instruments will be documented through a video series available for the public to follow and engage with online and through social media.

3D StringTheory explores how today’s new technologies, like 3D printing, can further expand musical boundaries.

For more information and to follow our project, visit: https://ottawasymphony.com/3dstringtheory/

This is one of the 200 exceptional projects funded through the Canada Council for the Arts’ New Chapter program. With this $35M investment, the Council supports the creation and sharing of the arts in communities across Canada.

About Canada Makes
Canada Makes is a network of private, public, academic, and non-profit entities dedicated to promoting the adoption and development of advanced and additive manufacturing (AM) in Canada. It is an enabler and accelerator of AM-adoption in Canada. The network covers a broad range of additive manufacturing technologies including 3D printing; reverse engineering 3D imaging; medical implants and replacement human tissue; metallic 3D printing and more.

The National 3D Printed Musical Instrument Challenge is an addition to the series of Pan-Canadian 3D Printing Challenges hosted by Canada Makes. The adoption of digital manufacturing technologies such as 3D printing requires new approaches to skills and training focused on building experiential and collaborative learning.

About Marina Kun

While raising four daughters, Marina entered the world of violins and shoulder rests. In 1972 her late husband, Joseph Kun, an Ottawa-based violin and bow maker designed and patented a revolutionary shoulder rest. When Marina joined the business in 1974, she took a tiny company selling only dozens of shoulder rests and turned it into a global market leader creating a household name in the international strings world. Creating the ‘KUN’ brand almost from scratch, her company now holds dozens of global patents and has the widest product range in the industry with no less than 80% of the world.

The KUN name has become an icon in the music industry and is one of the only Canadian companies that is a major manufacturer in the music world. In 2005, Marina’s company received the Design Exchange and National Post Gold Medal for Industrial Design for the Voce rest.

Marina was designated one of Canada’s top 100 Women Entrepreneurs in 2006 by PROFIT, and Kun Shoulder Rest Inc. received the Business of the Year Award by the Canadian Lebanese Chamber of Commerce and Industry (2004).
Full text: https://womensbusinessnetwork.ca/download.php?id=134

Media Contact:
Angela Schleihauf, Ottawa Symphony
marketing@ottawasymphony.com

613-983-7201

Canada Makes 3D Challenge Trophy, Concept to Product

View the following video showing the process of using both additive and subtractive manufacturing to go from a concept to a product. Thank you to our friends at Renishaw for sharing this wonder video.

The trophy was recently awarded to the team of Lisa Brock and Yanli Zhu from the University of Waterloo and their design of biodegradable packaging made from mushroom roots. canadamakes.ca/canada-makes-ann…eam-3d-challenge/

The award was presented during the first Conference of NSERC Network for Holistic Innovation in Additive Manufacturing (HI-AM) at the University of Waterloo.

Winning team of Yanli Zhu and Lisa Brock of the University of Waterloo with Frank Defalco of Canada Makes

Students were asked to focus on creating innovative tools or products that reduce our environmental footprint using additive manufacturing in tandem with conventional manufacturing approaches.

Lisa Brock and Yanli Zhu proposed the design of biodegradable packaging made from mushroom roots and agricultural waste using binder jetting additive manufacturing. The packaging design was created by optically 3D scanning the object. Approximately 10% of materials used in additive manufacturing can be recycled into new plastics, and the rest are disposed. The options for disposal are landfills and incineration, both of which increase the amount of greenhouse gases. Therefore, new biobased biodegradable materials must be developed to decrease the negative environmental impacts of these additive manufacturing plastics. https://youtu.be/XKU-BHKuGZI

 

Additive Manufacturing 101-7: What is vat photopolymerization?

(Image: 3D Hubs)

Vat Photopolymerization (Image: 3D Hubs)

  Mechanical Design Engineer and Additive Manufacturing Ph.D. student

This is the eighth article in a series of original articles that will help you understand the origins of the technology that is commonly called 3D printing. First an introduction, followed by the seven main technologies categories (binder jetting, directed energy deposition, material extrusion, material jetting, powder bed fusion, sheet lamination, vat photopolymerization) and then a design philosophy for additive manufacturing.

Vat Photopolymerization

ISO/ASTM definition: “vat photopolymerization, —an additive manufacturing process in which liquid photopolymer in a vat is selectively cured by light-activated polymerization.”[1]

Vat photopolymerization can also be known as (in alphabetical order):

➢ Continuous Liquid Interface Production or CLIP[2]

➢ Scan, Spin and Selectively Photocure Technology or 3SP[3]

➢ Solid Ground Curing or SGC[4]

➢ Stereolithography or SL[5]

➢ Stereolithography Apparatus or SLA® (3D Systems Corporation)

➢ Two-Photon Polymerization or 2PP[6]

Stereolithography was the first AM process to be invented. The first patent was filed in 1975 which described a two-laser 2PP process[7]. The first parts were made by Dr. Hideo Kodama of Japan using SL in 1981[8]. Additional patents followed in 1984 when in three different parts of the world, people patented the SL processes. First on May 23 in Japan by Yoji Marutani[9], then on July 16 in France by Jean Claude André, Alain Le Méhauté and Olivier de Witte[10], and lastly on August 8 in the United States by Charles W. Hull[5]. Chuck Hull was the first to commercialize the technology when he founded 3D Systems in 1986. In 1988, 3D Systems commissioned Alberts Consulting Group to create a file format that could be sliced, resulting in the STL file format[11]. In 1991, Cubital introduced the Solid Ground Curing process but later ceased operations in 1999. In 2015 Carbon3D introduced a novel concept named CLIP using an oxygen-permeable bottom plate to help speed up the printing process. As the original patents surrounding this technology have lapsed, many startups have emerged taking advantage of this original AM process.

vat photopolymerization

vat photopolymerization example

Figure 1: Vat Polymerization example setup[12]

This process involves using a liquid resin as the main type of material. Specifically, this liquid resin has the special property of being able to become solid once it is exposed to light. This light can be ultraviolet as in SL processes, or for 2PP, with two photons of near-infrared (NIR) light hit within a very short period of time (several femtoseconds)[12]. This liquid resin is held in a container or vat, in which a flat build platform is partially submerged. This platform starts near the surface of the liquid and then gets exposed to light. This light can be a UV laser(SL), a digital light processing (DLP) projector, a UV light bulb filtered through a printed mask(SGC), an LCD screen similar to home theater projectors(CLIP), or even from very quick pulses (femtoseconds in length) of near infrared (NIR) laser light tightly focused to a very small area(2PP). Once the resin is cured and made solid, the build platform either moves further into the vat, or partially comes out of the vat leaving the solid cured portion just under the surface and then the process is repeated. In the case of SGC, the uncured resin is removed and then replaced with a liquid wax that solidifies, and then both the cured resin and wax is machined flat using a cutter and prepared for the next layer. If the process involves the platform coming out of the vat the resin needs to be transparent or have the solidification process occur at the very bottom of a vat with a clear window or bottom. However, this can cause the resin to solidify to the bottom which would prevent the platform from moving, or cause it to solidify so closely to the bottom that when the build platform moves up, significant suction is created which results in very slow movements. Recent developments by Carbon3D and the creation of the CLIP process have resulted in very quick builds due to the clear bottom acting as an oxygen permeable membrane which inhibits solidification of the resin within a certain zone around the clear bottom of the vat, which eliminates this suction force. This has shown to increase build speeds from 25-100 times compared to other AM processes, including SL.

Advantages to this type of AM are that it is capable of very high detail surface finish, even down to the nano-scale level, it can be very fast compared to other processes in terms of pure volume, and it’s also able to be scaled up to build desk-sized objects in very large vats.

Disadvantages include a limited number of material properties found in UV curable resins, which are not the most robust materials in terms of durability, strength, or stability. These resins can change shape over time, potentially change colour, and usually need a post-curing UV light oven to cure the material fully in order to get the most strength out of them. Some resins are also toxic and special gloves need to be used to handle parts until they are fully cured. Depending on the geometry of the part, support structures are required and can be very complex and require manual removal afterwards.

References

[1] “ISO/ASTM 52900:2015(en), Additive manufacturing — General principles — Terminology,” International Organization for Standardization (ISO), Geneva, Switzerland, 2015.

[2] Tumbleston J. R., Shirvanyants D., Ermoshkin N., Janusziewicz R., Johnson A. R., Kelly D., Chen K., Pinschmidt R., Rolland J. P., Ermoshkin A., Samulski E. T., and DeSimone J. M., “Continuous liquid interface production of 3D objects,” Science, vol. 347, no. 6228, pp. 1349–1352, Mar. 2015.

[3] Groth C., Kravitz N. D., Jones P. E., Graham J. W., and Redmond W. R., “Three-dimensional printing technology.,” Journal of Clinical Orthodontics : JCO, vol. 48, no. 8, pp. 475–85, Aug. 2014.

[4] Levi H., “Accurate rapid prototyping by the solid ground curing technology,” in Proceedings of the 2nd Solid Freeform Fabrication Symposium (SFF), Austin, Texas, USA, 1991, pp. 110–114.

[5] Hull C. W., “Apparatus for production of three-dimensional objects by stereolithography,” U.S. Patent 4,575,330, 11-Mar-1986.

[6] Maruo S., Nakamura O., and Kawata S., “Three-dimensional microfabrication with two-photon-absorbed photopolymerization,” Optics Letters, vol. 22, no. 2, p. 132, Jan. 1997.

[7] Swanson W. K. and Kremer S. D., “Three dimensional systems,” U.S. Patent 4,078,229, 07-Mar-1978.

[8] Kodama H., “Automatic method for fabricating a three-dimensional plastic model with photo-hardening polymer,” Review of Scientific Instruments, vol. 52, no. 11, p. 1770, 1981.

[9] Marutani Y., “Optical Shaping Method,” Japanese Patent 60,247,515, 07-Dec-1985.

[10] André J. C., Mehaute A. Le, and Witte O. de, “Device For Producing A Model Of An Industrial Part,” French Patent 2,567,668, 17-Jan-1986.

[11] Allison J., “Re: History of .stl format,” [Online email], 15-Jan-1997. [Online]. Available: http://www.rp-ml.org/rp-ml-1997/0091.html. [Accessed: 05-Feb-2016].

[12] Gibson I., Rosen D. W., and Stucker B., Additive Manufacturing Technologies. Boston, MA: Springer US, 2010.

Nanogrande moves into a new larger facility

NanograndeMontreal, June 6, 2018— Canada Makes partner Nanogrande has moved to a new location in Montreal, multiplying the company’s floor space by four times of its previous business space. Mr. Juan Schneider, president and founder of Nanogrande, warmly welcomed his team to the new workspace this morning. Thanks to PME MTL Centre-Ouest, the company is entering a new phase of development that will see its tremendous increment in production and research capacity.

This new premise will truly open up the company’s potential for growth and creation,” said Schneider. “We now have the space to fully deploy our research and development department and our new assembly line.

This new workspace located in Montreal, a city with full technological explosion, will allow the company to get closer to the partners in its sector of activity to propel its development process. At the same time, Montreal being the capital of artificial intelligence, holds the key for Fourth Industrial Revolution, the heart of Nanogrande’s activity.

We have tried to stay close to our old facility, but the support we received from PME MTL Centre-Ouest convinced us,” said the president of Nanogrande. “The proximity of high-tech research centres, the many young companies in the sector and the determination of local decision-makers persuaded us to move our offices.

About Nanogrande
Nanogrande designs, manufactures and sells the world’s first molecular-scale additive printing technology and it combines nanotechnology with additive manufacturing, bridging the gap between semiconductor manufacturing and 3D printing. www.nanogrande.com

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For information :
Frédéric Mayer
Communication
514-966-5398
fmayer@nanogrande.com

Canada Makes once again to lead trade mission to Formnext in Germany

Canada Makes is once again looking for delegates interested in joining a trade mission to the Formnext trade-show in Frankfurt Germany November 13 to 16th. The four-day fact-finding mission will focus on additive manufacturing (AM) and offer the opportunity to meet with leading additive manufacturing companies and experts.

Formnext is the leading AM trade-show and the next generation of intelligent manufacturing solutions. It focuses on the efficient realization of parts and products, from their design to serial production. See cutting-edge technologies your company can leverage to gain a competitive edge and the latest expertise that can help in reducing your time-to-market. For more about Formnext click here.

Trade missions are about opening doors, gaining insights, business-to business contacts, information and tools for Canadian businesses, especially small and medium-sized enterprises (SMEs).

Martin Petrak, President and CEO of Precision ADM, had this to say about trade missions. “The Canada Makes trade mission to Germany was a great way for our company to connect with international additive manufacturing leaders. Being part of the delegation also gave us the opportunity to meet with other Canadian companies interested in collaborating on national and international business opportunities.”

David Saint John, Director of Innovation and Advanced Manufacturing
 Linamar Corporation said this about being a Canada Makes delegate, “The trade delegation organized by Canada Makes turned what would a been a good conference into a great one.  Any single attendee can be lost in the crowd, but when you are a part of a dedicated group of interested and engaged delegates you become hard to overlook.”

Join Canada Makes as a delegate and take full advantage of the benefits. Space is limited and are available on a first-come-first serve basis. Interested parties or for more information contact Frank Defalco frank.defalco@cme-mec.ca
Canada Makes will:

  • Set the agenda
  • Admission to the event
  • Offer logistical support
  • Arrange networking meetings with leading AM companies
  • Arrange market briefing from Canada’s German trade commissioner

In addition to your own travel and accommodation costs, Canada Makes/CME will charge an administration fee of $500.

Last year Canada Makes organized a very successful trade mission to Formnext and the knowledge and connections gained are proving invaluable to participants.

Fraunhofer’s Dr. Bernhard Mueller showing a lattice structure part printed on an EOS M400.

The Canada Makes delegation visited Fraunhofer booth and were introduced to some very interesting information, like the lattice structure Fraunhofer produced on their EOS W400.

The delegation will continue to arrange meetings with leading AM companies and meet with global leaders in additive manufacturing.

The opportunities Formnext offers was already obvious to the delegates after the first day, making this trade mission an excellent investment in time and money.

Canada Makes delegation at the Fraunhofer booth.

Canada Makes delegation visiting Trumpf at Formnext

Additive Manufacturing 101-6: What is sheet lamination?

(Image: 3D Hubs)

Material Jetting (Image: 3D Hubs)

  Mechanical Design Engineer and Additive Manufacturing Ph.D. student

This is the seventh article in a series of original articles that will help you understand the origins of the technology that is commonly called 3D printing. First an introduction, followed by the seven main technologies categories (binder jetting, directed energy deposition, material extrusion, material jetting, powder bed fusion, sheet lamination, vat photopolymerization) and then a design philosophy for additive manufacturing.

Sheet Lamination

ISO/ASTM definition: “sheet lamination, —an additive manufacturing process in which sheets of material are bonded to form a part.”[1]

Sheet Lamination can also be known as (in alphabetical order):

➢ Computer-Aided Manufacturing of Laminated Engineering Materials or CAM-LEM[2]

➢ Laminated Object Manufacturing or LOM[3]

➢ Plastic Sheet Lamination or PSL (Solidimension Ltd.)

➢ Selective Deposition Lamination or SDL (Mcor Technologies Ltd.)

➢ Ultrasonic Additive Manufacturing or UAM[4]

➢ Ultrasonic Consolidation or UC[5]

The LOM process was developed by a company named Helisys and in 1991 they started selling a machine that made 3D parts using rolls of paper and a CO2 laser[6]. The company eventually went bankrupt and later formed Cubic Technologies; however, in 1999, a company from Israel called Solidimension developed a system very similar to LOM using sheets of PVC plastic rather than paper[6]. Also in 1999, a USA company called Solidica (now Fabrisonic) patented a new hybrid method[7] which looked similar to LOM but used metal tapes and films which were joined using ultrasonic vibrations, and then a CNC machine used traditional subtractive manufacturing methods to remove material. In 2005, Japanese company Kira started production of a paper-based machine similar to LOM called the PLT-20 KATANA but using a steel cutter rather than a laser. By 2008 Mcor Technologies launched their first SDL machine called the Matrix which deposited individual sheets of A4 paper rather than rolls of paper like LOM or Kira and selectively glued down sheets which were then cut using a steel cutter. This process allowed Mcor to later develop full-colour parts by printing on the paper before being glued down.

Figure 1: Sheet lamination example setup[8]

This process starts with a single layer of solid material put across the build surface, be it paper (LOM and SDL) or PVC plastic (PSL) or metal (UAM/UC) or ceramic (CAM-LEM). This layer may or may not be bonded to the previous layers first as it depends on the process. Some processes bond the entire layer to the previous and then cut the 2D slice into the layer as with SDL or UAM, while other processes cut the 2D slice into the layer first, and then bond it onto the previous layers afterwards like CAM-LEM. The bonding between each layer occurs by a number of different methods depending on the process. For SDL and PSL, bonding is performed by applying a type of glue to the build surface. Layers are bonded together in LOM through melting a polymer that is embedded within the roll of paper. In the case of UC, the layers have an atomic migration between layers in a very small zone which fuses the layers together. The 2D slice data is either cut into the layer with a laser (LOM/CAM-LEM) or a blade (SDL/PSL) or machined away with a traditional CNC cutter (UAM/UC), and then the process starts over with a new solid layer being placed on top. In the CAM-LEM process, all the 2D layers are first pre-cut from a ceramic tape and then assembled and stacked on top of each other. Then a binder is added to give it strength before it is placed in an oven and fired to sinter the material together. With CAM-LEM, there is potential to cut the layers tangentially to the surface so that the traditional steps that are seen in AM are reduced and nearly eliminated[9], although it does not appear to have made it past the demonstration phase.

Advantages of this process tie directly to the individual processes. SDL can do full-colour prints, is relatively inexpensive since the raw material is normal office paper, can be infused with materials to increase strength or colour saturation, and excess material can be recycled. UC can do metal, and has the ability to do multi-metal layers within the overall part but not in the same layer, but can also embed other things into the part like wires, sensors, or fibres. CAM-LEM can process ceramic parts. No support material is needed since each layer is already solid and can support itself, although there are limitations to this as certain geometries like internal voids and cavities may not be possible.

A common disadvantage of all processes is that the layer height can’t be changed without changing the thickness of the sheets of material being used. Thus the layer steps and surface roughness is directly tied to sheet thickness. Regardless of the size of part being made, an entire sheet is consumed per layer, so material waste can be high if parts don’t make full use of the build volume. When layers are bonded before the 2D layer is cut out, the removal of excess material can be quite labour intensive. Excess material removal may not even be possible for some internal geometry. Even though UC creates solid metal parts, the bonds between layers are weaker than in the other directions, which could result in delamination. LOM cutting is performed with lasers and there is smoke and a chance of fire, which is why that technology was not very popular and why it moved to steel cutters instead.

References

[1] “ISO/ASTM 52900:2015(en), Additive manufacturing — General principles — Terminology,” International Organization for Standardization (ISO), Geneva, Switzerland, 2015.
[2] Cawley J. D., Heuer A. H., Newman W. S., and Mathewson B. B., “Computer-aided manufacturing of laminated engineering materials,” American Ceramic Society Bulletin, vol. 75, no. 5, pp. 75–79, 1996.

[3] Feygin M. and Hsieh B., “Laminated object manufacturing: A simpler process,” in Proceedings of the 2nd Solid Freeform Fabrication Symposium (SFF), Austin, Texas, USA, 1991, pp. 123–130.

[4] Sriraman M. R., Babu S. S., and Short M., “Bonding characteristics during very high power ultrasonic additive manufacturing of copper,” Scripta Materialia, vol. 62, no. 8, pp. 560–563, Apr. 2010.

[5] Kong C. Y., Soar R. C., and Dickens P. M., “Optimum process parameters for ultrasonic consolidation of 3003 aluminium,” Journal of Materials Processing Technology, vol. 146, no. 2, pp. 181–187, Feb. 2004.

[6] Wohlers T. and Gornet T., “History of Additive Manufacturing,” in Wohlers Report 2014 – 3D Printing and Additive Manufacturing State of the Industry, Wohlers Associates Inc, 2014, pp. 1–34.

[7] White D., “Ultrasonic object consolidation,” U.S. Patent 6,519,500, 11-Feb-2003.

[8] Upcraft S. and Fletcher R., “The rapid prototyping technologies,” Assembly Automation, vol. 23, no. 4, pp. 318–330, Dec. 2003.

[9] Zheng Y., Choi S., Mathewson B. B., and Newman W. S., “Progress in Computer-Aided Manufacturing of Laminated Engineering Materials Utilizing Thick, Tangent-Cut Layers,” in Proceedings of the 7th Solid Freeform Fabrication Symposium (SFF), Austin, Texas, USA, 1996, pp. 355–362.

Canada Makes Announces first ever winning team for the 3D Challenge

Waterloo, Ontario May 22, 2018 – Canada Makes is very pleased to announce the first ever recipients of the Canada Makes 3D Challenge award. The team of Lisa Brock and Yanli Zhu from the University of Waterloo and their design of biodegradable packaging made from mushroom roots best met the criteria of the Challenge, Design solutions for a sustainable future.

“We had contestants from PEI to BC with wonderfully innovative designs and if ideas like this years winning entry is any indication of future designs Canada will most certainly be a World leading innovator in additive manufacturing,” Frank Defalco, Manager Canada Makes

The award was presented during the first Conference of NSERC Network for Holistic Innovation in Additive Manufacturing (HI-AM) at the University of Waterloo.

Winning team of Yanli Zhu and Lisa Brock of the University of Waterloo with Frank Defalco of Canada Makes

Students were asked to focus on creating innovative tools or products that reduce our environmental footprint using additive manufacturing in tandem with conventional manufacturing approaches.

Lisa Brock and Yanli Zhu proposed the design of biodegradable packaging made from mushroom roots and agricultural waste using binder jetting additive manufacturing. The packaging design was created by optically 3D scanning the object. Approximately 10% of materials used in additive manufacturing can be recycled into new plastics, and the rest are disposed. The options for disposal are landfills and incineration, both of which increase the amount of greenhouse gases. Therefore, new biobased biodegradable materials must be developed to decrease the negative environmental impacts of these additive manufacturing plastics. https://youtu.be/XKU-BHKuGZI

We thank all participants of the first ever Canada Makes 3D Challenge. The finalists were; Gitanjali Shanbhag and Issa introduced a design for light-weighting a helicopter tail designs for the tail boom of Airbus H13. Ken Nsiempba submitted a redesign of an internal boat tail support bracket. Nathaniel Claus offered a ONE BIKE concept that allows bikes to transcend limitations set by current production trends through a convertible parts system. Haley Butler is working on developing a potato starch-based plastic 􀂡lament that is suitable for 3D printing. See the finalists’ presentations. canadamakes.ca/canada-makes-3d-…eo-presentations

Renishaw Canada, Burloak Technologies, Altair, Precision ADM, AMM, CAMufacturing, Innotech Alberta, Cimetrix, CRIQ and ISED.

We would also like to thank our partners for their support, without it we would not have been able to make the Canada Makes 3D Challenge a reality.

About HI-AM
The NSERC/CFI HI-AM Network has been conceived to work on innovative solutions to address the challenges associated with metal AM processes/products and to equip Canada for the era of Industry 4.0 and “digital-to-physical conversion.” All HI-AM Network participants meet once a year to present their research findings to the other research teams within the Network and the representatives of our industrial partners. Hosted by a different institution each year, the conference provides a great networking opportunity for the graduate students and PDFs to get to know their colleagues – future additive manufacturing experts of Canada! conference.nserc-hi-am.ca

About the 3D Challenge
Canada Makes holds a yearly Pan-Canadian 3D Printing Challenge for any postsecondary students enrolled in a Canadian college or university. Students in Canada can help change the World with a new idea that uses 3D Printing and win cash prizes and a chance at one of two one-year paid internships! The adoption of digital manufacturing technologies such as 3D printing requires new approaches to skills and training focused on building experiential and collaborative learning. To foster this objective, the Canada Makes 3D Challenge will challenge university/college teams to design a part and compete for a full one-year paid internship from a Burloak Technologies. canadamakes.ca/events/canada-makes-3d-challenge/

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Workshop: Industrial applications of 3D – Presented by Réseau Québec-3D, Canada Makes & AON3D

This is rescheduled from June 20 to September 12, 2018

June 20th is the next in our series of additive manufacturing workshops Industrial applications of 3D hosted by Montreal’s AON3D. Réseau Québec-3D and Canada Makes are again partnering to showcase some of Canada’s leading experts in 3D printing. This half-day workshop will focus on industrial applications of the 3D technology- how 3D can help you gain an adavantge.

Topics will include; The Journey from Prototyping to Production, a look at how companies have successfully adapted AM since the 90’s, 3D Printing in construction, 3D scanning applications and more. The workshop’s goal is to enlighten you and stimulate thought on how 3D technology can be used in your business.

Recently, certain sectors have seen dramatic shifts in the way they operate. How fast can it happen? Take the U.S. hearing aid industry, it converted to 100% additive manufacturing in less than 500 days. According to one industry CEO, not one company that stuck to traditional manufacturing methods survived. Examples like this speak for themselves about the potential disruption 3D printing can have.

Join us and learn about the power of 3D printing and how companies have prospered through its adoption. 

Real business opportunities are available to those who understand how to use this powerful new tool as part of their process. The workshop offers the chance to meet face-to-face and network with some of Canada’s leaders in additive manufacturing (AM).

We look forward to seeing you, seating is limited so sign up now as our workshops sell out fast!

Date: September 12, 2018
Time: 8 a.m. – 12:00 p.m.
Location: AON3D
9494 Boul. St. Laurent Suite 600
Montreal QC, H2N 1P4

Cost: 
$25 Réseau Québec-3D & CME Canada Makes Members
$50 Non-Members

Members register here

Non-members register here

Agenda

Time Topic Speaker
8:00 – 9:00 a.m. Registration and Networking coffee  
9:00 – 9:30 a.m. Welcome Remarks & Unlocking new industrial applications in 3D printing through materials Kevin Han, CEO AON3D
9:30 – 10:00 a.m. 3D scanning and 3D printing technologies for the construction sector Martin Lavoie, Creadditive
10:00 – 10:30 a.m. Networking Break
10:30 – 11:00 a.m. 3D scanning, its applications and how it improves time to market Vincent Goudreault, 3D Metrology Expert Creaform
11:00 – 11:30 a.m. 3D Printing… the Journey from Prototyping to Production Gilles Desharnais, CEO Axis Prototype
11:30 – 12:00 p.m. Sujets concrets de pièces industrielles en impression 3D metal Cyrille Chanal, CEO FusiA Impression 3D Métal

About Réseau Québec-3D
The Réseau Québec-3D network is helping rally a community around additive manufacturing. Interested parties include stakeholders from aeronautics, ground transportation, and the energy industry, as well as mould manufacturers, machining companies, and people from the medical and dental sectors. University, college, and industry researchers are also taking part, along with 3D printing manufacturers and manufacturers and distributors of the raw materials used for 3D printing and metal-processing and composite material companies.

About AON3D
AON3D is a rapidly growing startup on a mission to put industrial 3D printing capabilities into the hands of those who need it most. Our technology has made it 10 times cheaper than before to 3D print with advanced thermoplastics, and we continue to push the boundaries on commercializing new materials for 3D printing.

Contact information:
Frank Defalco, Manager Canada Makes
Frank.defalco@cme-mec.ca

FusiA Impression 3D Métal & Groupe Meloche join forces to carry out additive manufacturing projects in the aerospace sector

FusiA Impression 3D Métal, a Canada Makes member company specialized in the 3D printing of metal parts and Groupe Meloche, a major supplier of aerostructure and aircraft engine components to original equipment manufacturers (OEMs) and Tier-1integrators, have signed a partnership agreement to carry out projects in the additive manufacturing of components for prime contractors in the global aerospace sector.

“This strategic partnership enables us to add additive manufacturing technology to our offering and gives us a competitive edge in our mission as a world-class aerospace integrator,” said Hugue Meloche, President and Chief Executive Officer, Groupe Meloche.

Already well positioned in the supply chain for aerostructure and aircraft engine component manufacturing, Groupe Meloche is now able to offer intelligent manufacturing services to all its customers. The company also specializes in manufacturing engineering, complex machining, surface treatment, painting, value-added assemblies, and non-destructive testing. Groupe Meloche is in the process of patenting a highly specialized non-destructive test bench technology.

Groupe FusiA specializes in the production of 3D printing metal parts for the aeronautics, space and defence sectors in France and Canada. Thanks to its experience and numerous R&D projects, it is today a recognized expert in additive manufacturing. Established since 2014 in Québec, the company offers, through its subsidiary FusiA Impression 3D Métal, its know-how in the 3D manufacturing of metal parts from a production facility in Greater Montréal.

“With the signing of this agreement, we are well positioned to penetrate this rapidly growing sector more rapidly thanks to Groupe Meloche’s expertise and its sustained march towards establishing a true 4.0 factory,” explains Cyrille Chanal, President of FusiA.

In recent years, Groupe Meloche has made significant investments in automation and advanced machining technologies. “3D printing is part of our goal to deliver world-class performance to our customers in terms of quality, on-time deliveries and manufacturing turnaround times,” adds Mr. Normand Sauvé, Vice President, Innovation and Infrastructure.

About Groupe Meloche (www.melocheinc.com)
Founded in 1974 in Salaberry-de-Valleyfield, Groupe Meloche provides aerostructure and aircraft engine components to original equipment manufacturers (OEM) and Tier-1 integrators through a vertical integration strategy that includes precision machining, surface treatment, painting, assembly and non-destructive testing. The company owns four production sites near Montreal, including one in Bromont and its head office in Salaberry-de-Valleyfield. It employs a total of 200 individuals who have access to modern workshops with over 45 machining and CNC turning centres. The corporation generates annual sales of more than $60 million.

About Groupe FusiA (www.fusia.fr)
Groupe FusiA specializes in the additive manufacturing (3D printing) of metal parts in France and Canada. It has gained extensive expertise in 3D printing through sustained investments in R&D since 2011 (more than 25 projects). Its know-how enables it to offer services from the design phase to production, in accordance with the aerospace sector’s highest standards. Its subsidiary, FusiA Impression 3D Métal, has been based in Québec since 2014 and has a production facility in Saint-Eustache. Groupe FusiA is also a leader in France through its subsidiary FusiA Aeroadditive, certified by the Safran Group. It recently obtained a series contracts for more than 1,000 parts from major European aerospace prime contractors.

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For more information contact
Nancy German
nancygerman@primacom.ca
514 924-4445

AMM announces partnership with Dimanex, a global enterprise for distributed 3D manufacturing

Additive Metal Manufacturing Inc. (AMM), a Canada Makes member company, is an independent Canadian 3D Printing metal service provider announced it is expanding its on-demand Electronic Warehouse replenishment capabilities by partnering with DiManEx, a Dutch Company that provides a cloud-based, end-to-end service for distributed 3D manufacturing.

This is ideal for manufacturers and parts intensive companies. The digital supply platform can be accessed remotely to initiate the production of parts with the click of a button.

AMM’s President, Norman Holesh said, “technology is now allowing companies to free up large amounts of working capital by printing parts on demand rather than filling warehouses with parts in anticipation of a demand that may never materialize.”

The Electronic Warehouse provides new solutions to existing supply chain dilemmas. A lot size of one is now a reality and broken or lost tooling a nightmare of the past.

A notable partnership was announced recently with the Royal Dutch Army, that is embedding additive manufacturing systems within its Land Systems programs and to support the missions of its Material Stock Logistics Command. They’ve already run a successful pilot on an active combat vehicle for which they’ve been able to solve problems for spare / service parts which were no longer available or had become obsolete after buying more than needed to satisfy Minimum Order Quantities.

Colonel and Head of Innovation at the Dutch Army, Robert Meeuwsen, has said, “This proves that 3D printing and other Additive Manufacturing (AM) techniques are ready for regular business operations. We hope other organizations will be open to taking this new route as well.”

‘We’ve only seen the beginning pf the impact additive manufacturing will have on industrial supply chains across the globe, supplying any part anywhere with a simple click of a button,” said Tibor van Melsem Kocsis, founder and CEO.

About Additive Metal Manufacturing Inc
AMM is a Product Design Consulting, Rapid Prototyping, Additive Metal Production independent service bureau located in Toronto, Ontario.

About DiManEx
DiManEx is a global enterprise platform for distributed 3D manufacturing. Unlike an open marketplace, we provide a dedicated cloud-based end-to-end service. Our smart platform and service combined with strong global partnerships provide the best customer results and experience.

For further information contact:

Additive Metal Manufacturing Inc – www.additivemet.com
David Slimowitz (david@additivemet.com) at 905-738-0410 ext. 2

Dimanex – www.dimanex.com
Henk Jonker (henk.jonker@dimanex.com) at +31 6 129 224 25

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