News

Coffee lovers create portable pour-over kettle on NAIT 3D printer

Pursuit of the perfect cup leads to a prototype and a new business venture

The pour-over may be one of the simplest yet most appreciated brewing methods among coffee connoisseurs. In boutique cafés, baristas add water to cones of gourmet grounds placed over cups, extracting maximum flavour and richness. Discerning customers happily wait from 2-and-a-half to 4 minutes for their caffeine kick.

Edmonton entrepreneurs Matthew Semaka and Steven Osterlund wanted to enjoy that same experience – and coffee – outside the café. “We talked about being able to go to the river valley and make a cup of nice coffee with a small kit,” says Osterlund. “It has just kind of grown from there.”

With the help of NAIT’s 3D metal printer – the only one west of Winnipeg – the pair has developed a one-of-a-kind, insulated kettle specifically designed for the perfect, portable pour-over. It’s a back-to-basics approach to coffee-making that might provide a new entry point into a market worth $6.2 billion in Canada alone.

“Coffee is a huge, huge industry – manual brew is just exploding,” says Osterlund.

prototype pour-over coffee kettles made on NAIT's 3D metal printer by Edmonton entrepreneurs Matthew Semaka and Steven Osterlund

The art of the pour-over

Originating in Japan, the pour-over is almost meditative in practice: pouring a slow, steady stream of water heated to a particular temperature over a precise amount of perfectly ground beans. It’s also effective in ways other manual brew methods aren’t, as fresh water is continuously added to the coffee, essentially releasing the flavour out of the bean and into the cup.

“Heat consistency and stability is important while conducting a manual coffee extraction,” says Semaka.

Semaka and Osterlund knew that there were good kettles – featuring the distinctive, slender gooseneck spout required for the technique – already on the market. But many had plastic components that would melt when heated over a fire or outdoor stove and were too bulky to be portable. The only solution they could see was to make their own.

After a chance meeting with Paul Dews, NAIT’s manager of innovation support services, they discovered they could do just that through the polytechnic’s TechGym. There, they had access to equipment for prototyping and small-scale manufacturing, including the printer, which makes objects by depositing layer upon layer of metal.

Osterlund wasn’t surprised that NAIT had a 3D metal printer. He was, however, “more surprised that us, just being members of the public, were able to come in and utilize it.”

The team drafted a couple of computer-generated designs and by January 2017 had their first printed stainless-steel prototype. It took 3 days to print, and weighed just over 1 kilogram. But it was the start they needed. In March, Semaka and Osterlund incorporated as Ketl Lab.

coffee pour-over kettle made by Edmonton entrepreneurs Matthew Semaka and Steven Osterlund on NAIT's 3d metal printer

Pursuit of the perfect cup

Two versions later, the kettle has changed substantially. It’s now about one-fifth the initial weight and more compact. The handle has been made unnecessary thanks to innovative insulation (the same used by NASA) that keeps the exterior cool while heating water faster and holding a consistent temperature.

The potential applications have evolved as well. Canadian Manufacturers & Exporters (CME), the country’s largest trade and industry association, believes the technology could also be used in hospitals or on construction sites.

Much of the work so far has been made possible by grants from Canada Makes, a CME network dedicated to promoting additive manufacturing in Canada. NAIT was instrumental in introducing Ketl Lab to this program, says Semaka.

Now, what began as a hobby and was nurtured in a lab at NAIT, may soon be a marketable reality. The fourth – and potentially last – kettle prototype is in the works, with tweaks that may include a Bluetooth monitoring system. While it’s possible a product may be ready for sale within a year, the team won’t rush it.

The company’s focus, Osterlund says, is on “getting it right than getting it released.”

Time may be on their side. “What we are doing is not on the market today – it doesn’t exist,” says Semaka. Their potential customers, too, are likely the patient kind. Like a perfect pour-over coffee, good things are worth the wait.

SOURCE – Words: Amanda Stadel | Images: Blaise van Malsen

CME Survey: Women in Manufacturing. Have your Say

Help Canadian Manufacturers & Exporters (CME) and our partners support, promote and inspire women to pursue careers in manufacturing.

Did you know in Canada, women account for 48 per cent of the labour force but only 28 per cent of the manufacturing workforce? More concerning still is that there has been no increase in the share of manufacturing jobs held by women over the last 15 years. Only six per cent of employed women in Canada have a job in manufacturing compared to 13 per cent of all men.

Attracting more women into manufacturing professions is critical to helping companies grow and to replace the existing and aging workforce. To do this, we must better understand the current realities of women in Canadian industry.

This survey aims to identify the challenges women face in advancing their careers in manufacturing, the perception of manufacturing as a career option for women, and the barriers that impede women-led manufacturing firms.

Please help us by filling out this survey.

We would also be grateful if you would encourage women working in your organization and in your network to complete this survey.

The survey itself consists of no more than 30 questions and should take less than 10 minutes to complete. The deadline for completion is September 22, 2017 and your responses will be held in strict confidence.

Survey link: https://www.surveymonkey.com/r/cmewim

Based on the survey findings, CME and our partners will work with the manufacturing community, government leaders and industry stakeholders to create and implement an action plan that can assist Canadian manufacturers in attracting, retaining and advancing women in manufacturing careers in Canada. This action plan will be released in the fall of 2017 at CME’s Annual Meeting and Advanced Manufacturing Symposium, The New Face of Manufacturing in Ottawa.

Thank you in advance for your input and your support.

Background 
Canadian Manufacturers & Exporters’ (CME) Women in Manufacturing Working Group was launched by National Board of Directors Chair Rhonda Barnet in March 2017. The Working Group was created in response to a key recommendation from CME’s Industrie 2030 initiative regarding the need to attract more women to manufacturing to help address chronic labour and skills shortages in the sector.

Chaired by Elise Maheu, the Working Group includes women and men representing CME member companies from a wide range of sizes and industries. The Working Group is dedicated to supporting, promoting and inspiring women to pursue careers in manufacturing.

If you have any questions or require anything further, please do not hesitate to contact Marie Morden, Manager, Stakeholder Relations, CME at marie.morden@cme-mec.ca.

CAD MicroSolutions Partners with Canada Makes to Enable Innovation in Canada

CAD MicrosolutionsOTTAWA, Ontario, August 30, 2017 – Canada Makes is pleased to announce a new partnership with CAD MicroSolutions Inc., a leading provider of mechatronics and additive manufacturing solutions in Canada. This strategic partnership comes as CAD MicroSolutions has recently expanded their additive manufacturing profile to include the full Markforged 3D printing line of products, Nano Dimension’s 3D PCB printer the DragonFly 2020, and HP’s Jet Fusion 3D printing solutions.

At the cusp of the 4th industrial revolution – Industry 4.0 – Canadian manufacturers are required to be agile, innovative, and make informed investments to remain competitive in an exponentially growing market.

“CAD MicroSolutions is thrilled to be part of Canada Makes and play a significant role in Canada’s Industry 4.0 and Additive Manufacturing (AM) sector.” Said Hargurdeep Singh, Additive Manufacturing Consultant at CAD MicroSolutions. “Our role as an Innovation Enabler is to provide top-notch systems in automation software, training and consulting to help ensure that our clients realize the greatest value from their technology investment.”

CAD MicroSolutions has been enabling innovation in Canada for over 30 years by providing clients with business solutions which address the full product lifecycle from conception through design, prototyping, visualization, simulation and production. With an increasingly significant position in the additive manufacturing industry, CAD MicroSolutions has chosen to establish this partnership to contribute to the growth, awareness and adoption of additive manufacturing in Canada, and to gain exposure to Canada Makes’ vast, nation-wide network of engineers, designers and manufacturers. With a large clientele base in the same space, CAD MicroSolutions anticipates that this partnership will enable their clients to network and collaborate across organizations, participate in and attend demonstrations, workshops and events, and stay at the forefront of additive manufacturing trends in Canada.

The Canadian Manufacturing Technology Show (CMTS) takes place September 25-28 at The International Centre in Mississauga, and CAD MicroSolutions will be hosting booth #1043. They will also be hosting a number of Launch Events throughout Ontario in October to explore the latest in SolidWorks 2018 3D CAD software as well as additive manufacturing solutions, virtual reality business solutions, and the latest in Industry 4.0 trends.

About CAD MicroSolutions
CAD MicroSolutions, headquartered in Toronto, Ontario, has been providing engineers, designers and manufacturers with 3D technology and training for the entire product development lifecycle for over 30 years. CAD MicroSolutions is uniquely positioned to help their clients enable innovation across Canada, selling and supporting 3D printing solutions and Virtual Reality solutions as well as design automation software, training and consultation to help clients in mechatronics innovate, design and succeed. For more information about CAD MicroSolutions, please visit www.cadmicro.com or call 1-888-401-5885.

About Canada Makes
Canada Makes, a Canadian Manufacturers & Exporters (CME) initiative. CME is Canada’s largest trade and industry association, and the voice of manufacturing and global business in Canada. Canada Makes is a network of private, public, academic, and non-profit entities dedicated to promoting the adoption and development of advanced and additive manufacturing (AM) in Canada. It is an enabler and accelerator of AM-adoption in Canada.

Humber College partners with Canada Makes

Canada Makes is pleased to announce Humber College Institute of Advanced Learning as its newest academic Humber Collegepartner. Humber has chosen to establish this strategic partnership with Canada Makes because of the benefit in gaining exposure to its nation-wide network focused on additive manufacturing (AM).

Canada Makes brings together leading manufacturers, designers, engineers and stakeholders interested in promoting the adoption and awareness of additive manufacturing.

“Partnering with Canada Makes strengthens our growth and depth in technology education and the knowledge that we can provide to our students. By joining Canada Makes our students will have access to the thousands of industry partners within CME’s network. We’ll gain insights on how to adopt new, relevant technologies ensuring that our graduates are job-ready upon graduation.” said Chris Whitaker, Humber President and CEO. “As our goal is to prepare students for the workforce, these industry collaborations help develop skills and provide networking opportunities that brings significant value to our students, faculty and partners.”

Humber College’s membership allows Canada Makes to keep one of its founding partners, Farzad Rayegani, the new Dean at the Humber School of Applied Technology. Farzad is an important member of Canada Makes’ Additive Manufacturing Advisory Board (AMAB) and continues to be a leading proponent both nationally and globally in the delivery of 3D Challenge competitions. Canada Makes will take full advantage of his expertise for the soon to be announced national Canada Makes 3D Challenge.

“Additive manufacturing includes 3D technology such as printing, reverse engineering 3D imaging, metallic 3D printing and medical implants and replacement human tissue,” says Farzad Rayegani. “Our partnership is an opportunity for Humber students to become more familiar with 3D technology, including the opportunity to participate in both national and global 3D Challenge competitions.”

“This new partnership will allow me to continue consulting with Farzad in how best Canada Makes can help develop the skills required for today and tomorrow’s innovative workers for Canadian industry,” said Frank Defalco, Manager Canada Makes. “ I’m very happy he’s still with us.”

Humber has substantially enhanced its manufacturing technologies capabilities in recent years, adding facilities such as its Maker Space lab and the Centre for Entrepreneurship. And, soon to follow is the Centre for Technology Innovation, due to be open to students in the fall of 2018.

About Humber College Institute of Technology & Advanced Learning
Established in 1967, Humber is one of Canada’s leading postsecondary institutions. Committed to student success through excellence in teaching and learning, Humber serves 29,200 full-time students and 23,000 part time and continuing education students. With an internationally recognized reputation for quality learning, Humber offers a wide-range of career-focused opportunities for students to personalize their educational path, including 160 full-time programs across more than 40 fields of study, 200 part-time and 400 online programs or courses. More than four out of five of Humber graduates are employed within six months of completing their studies. Visit humber.ca.

About Canada Makes
Canada Makes, a Canadian Manufacturers & Exporters (CME) initiative. CME is Canada’s largest trade and industry association, and the voice of manufacturing and global business in Canada. Canada Makes is a network of private, public, academic, and non-profit entities dedicated to promoting the adoption and development of advanced and additive manufacturing (AM) in Canada. It is an enabler and accelerator of AM-adoption in Canada.

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Government of Canada launches 1.26-billion dollars Strategic Innovation Fund

Today, the Honourable Navdeep Bains, Minister of Innovation, Science and Economic Development, launched the Strategic Innovation Fund, a 1.26-billion dollars investment that is fully aligned with the strong, coordinated government action Canadian Manufacturers & Exporters (CME) has long advocated for to reinvigorate the Canadian manufacturing sector and help it compete globally.

To be competitive on a global scale, Canadian manufacturers must adopt the newest advanced manufacturing techniques and commercialize new or improved goods to develop new business lines, attract investment and new production mandates and, expand the range of goods produced in Canada. CME has assessed that, without decisive action from the government to facilitate the transition to innovative technologies, Canada is at risk of falling behind other countries with whom we compete and trade. The Government of Canada Strategic Innovation Fund is a step in the right direction to encourage high-quality investments in new technologies and help close the gap with our major international competitors.

This fund is open to all industries and will support four streams of innovation activities:

  • Stream 1: Encourage R&D that will accelerate technology transfer and commercialization of innovative products, processes and services;
  • Stream 2: Facilitate the growth and expansion of firms in Canada;
  • Stream 3: Attract and retain large-scale investments to Canada; and
  • Stream 4: Advance industrial research, development and technology demonstration through collaboration between academia, non-profit organizations and the private sector.

For-profit corporations are eligible for all four streams (some restrictions applying to Stream 4) and can apply for more than one stream. Applicants are invited to submit a “Statement of Interest” prior to moving forward with their full application. Successful applicants to the Streams 1,2 and 3 could be granted up to 50 per cent of the cost of a project while 100% of costs could be covered under Stream 4. More details about the Strategic Innovation Fund, including application processes, guidelines, and project eligibility, can be found here.

Through its Industrie 2030 initiative, CME identified fostering innovation, commercialization and new product development, as a key priority for the manufacturing sector. Industrie 2030 is the result of consultations with more than 1,250 leading industry executives and detailed research to define specific recommendations to overcome challenges and create a roadmap for the future of manufacturing, to strengthen its footprint across the country, and to drive growth, innovation, wealth creation and jobs. Last year, we called on the government to create a manufacturing commercialization investment fund to provide risk-sharing supports as part of the of pre-budget recommendations. CME has also made fostering innovation part of its key NAFTA asks.

Thank you for your ongoing support of CME’s efforts to make your company, manufacturing and exporting in Canada innovative, growing and, globally competitive. If you have any questions on this program or other activities that CME is pursuing on your behalf, please do not hesitate to contact me at any time at president@cme-mec.ca.

Sincerely,
Dennis A. Darby, P.Eng., ICD.D
President & CEO, Canadian Manufacturers and Exporters

Quebec to Open Its First Medical 3D Printing Center

Quebec is about to become a bigger presence on the 3D printing map, as the province’s government has agreed to provide $2,983,800 for the development and implementation of a new medical 3D printing center. The establishment of the center is the focus of a collaborative, $3,729,750 project between the Quebec Industrial Research Center (CRIQ) and the CHU of Québec-Université Laval, which is the largest specialty care center in Quebec and one of the largest in Canada.

The CRIQ was established to make the province more competitive through innovation – and innovation will certainly be a large part of the new medical center, which will focus on the production of 3D printed, customized prosthetics and bioprinted tissue, as well as research into the bioprinting of functional human organs.

François Blais [Image: Simon Clark]

“This promising partnership between the CRIQ and the CHU of Québec-Université Laval will make Capitale-Nationale and Quebec leaders in the manufacture of 3D prostheses and specialized medical equipment,” said François Blais, Minister of Employment and Social Solidarity and Minister responsible for the Capitale-Nationale region. “Patients will benefit first and foremost from the innovations that will result from this new center. I am convinced that sharing the expertise of the CRIQ and the CHU of Québec-Université Laval will contribute to the success of this promising project.”

According to Denis Hardy, CEO of the CRIQ, Quebec has long been dependent on foreign products, and the new medical center will allow the province to become more autonomous in terms of health care. For the last five years, the CRIQ has been exploring 3D printing, he said, and the center now offers 3D printing services that include feasibility studies, prototyping, and short-run production. CRIQ will combine its 3D printing knowledge with the CHU’s medical expertise to form a powerhouse of technology and medicine.

“We will have the opportunity to work with the surgeons at the CHU de Québec-Université Laval to develop new medical applications,” said Hardy. “Collaboration between our organizations is a unique opportunity to innovate to advance health care. The complementary nature of the expertise of CRIQ and the CHU of Québec-Université Laval is a key factor that gives every chance of success to such a project.”

Medical 3D printing isn’t new to Quebec, or the CHU for that matter – according to Dr. Gaston Bernier, dentist/oncologist at CHU, the hospital system has already used the technology to 3D print metal bars to rebuild the jaws of patients with cancer. In his opinion, medical 3D printing signals a “game change,” separating modern medicine into two eras: medicine before 3D printing, and medicine after 3D printing.

Although the province will benefit financially from greater autonomy in medical production, as well as a position at the forefront of technological innovation, it’s ultimately the patients who will benefit the most from what the new 3D printing medical center can offer.

“3D printing will enable the medicine of tomorrow to open previously inaccessible fields of application,” said Gertrude Bourdon, President and CEO of Québec-Université Laval University Hospital. “For our patients, this means increased comfort and shorter surgery thanks to custom-made prostheses and possible access to new surgeries that were previously unattainable. For our medical teams, this reduces intervention time and costs, facilitates fitting of prostheses and reduces the risks associated with medical interventions.”

The establishment of the medical 3D printing center fits into a larger economic plan, introduced in May of this year, called the Quebec Research and Innovation Strategy 2017-2022 – Daring to innovate. The plan aims to make Quebec one of the most innovative and creative locations in the world by 2030. You can learn more about the Quebec Research and Innovation Strategy here. Discuss in the Quebec forum at 3DPB.com.

Join Canada Makes as a delegate for AM trade mission to Formnext in Germany

Canada Makes is looking for delegates interested in joining a trade mission to the Formnext trade-show in Frankfurt Germany this coming November 14 to 17th. The four-day fact-finding mission will focus on additive manufacturing (AM) and offer the opportunity to meet with leading AM industries stakeholders.

Formnext is the leading AM trade-show and the next generation of intelligent manufacturing solutions and will provide a European perspective. It focuses on the efficient realization of parts and products, from their design to serial production. See cutting-edge technologies your company can leverage to gain a competitive edge and the latest expertise that can help in reducing your time-to-market. For more about Formnext click here.

Trade missions are about opening doors, gaining insights, business-to business contacts, information and tools for Canadian businesses, especially small and medium-sized enterprises (SMEs).

Join Canada Makes as a delegate and take full advantage of the benefits. Only a limited number of spaces are available on a first-come-first serve basis. Interested parties or for more information please contact Frank Defalco frank.defalco@cme-mec.ca
Canada Makes will:

  • Set the agenda
  • Admission to the event
  • Offer logistical support
  • Arrange networking meetings with leading AM companies
  • Arrange market briefing from Canada’s German trade commissioner

In addition to your own travel and accommodation costs, Canada Makes/CME will charge an administration fee of $500.

Martin Petrak, President and CEO of Precision ADM, had this to say about trade missions. “The Canada Makes trade mission to Germany was a great way for our company to connect with international additive manufacturing leaders. Being part of the delegation also gave us the opportunity to meet with other Canadian companies interested in collaborating on national and international business opportunities.”

Last year Canada Makes organized two successful trade missions to Germany and the UK. The knowledge and connections gained are proving invaluable to its participants. View past postings on the trade missions.

Canada Makes’ UK trade mission successfully concludes
Canada Makes’ trade mission to Germany

About CME
CME is Canada’s largest trade and industry association, and the voice of manufacturing and global business in Canada. Founded in 1871, CME represents more than 10,000 leading companies nationwide, and – through various initiatives, including the establishment of the Canadian Manufacturing Coalition – touches more than 100,000 companies from coast to coast, engaged in manufacturing, international trade, and service-related industries.

About Canada Makes
A CME initiative, Canada Makes is a network of private, public, academic, and non-profit entities dedicated to promoting the adoption and development of additive manufacturing in Canada. For more on Canada Makes, please visit canadamakes.ca

Edmit Industries joins Canada Makes

Canada Makes is pleased to welcome Edmit Industries as a new member. Since 2008, the Chateauguay Quebec based Edmit has been working with metal additive manufacturing (AM) technology and developing unique ways of combining it with their other core competencies, allowing them to provide significant value added to their clients.Edmit

“We here at Edmit are looking forward to being part of Canada Makes’ network to promote the use of innovative manufacturing technologies such as additive manufacturing AM and meeting potential contacts whom we can develop and ultimately manufacture products,” said Sergio Armano, President Edmit Industries.

“Edmit is one of the first companies, if not the first, in Canada to acquire metal AM technology,” said Frank Defalco, Manager Canada Makes. “We are looking forward to continue working closely with them in bringing their considerable capabilities to Canadian companies.”

“Edmit’s mission is to support clients to design products for the manufacturing process that best meets theirs requirements,” added Armano. “We assist them through the development and prototyping process, and ultimately receive the mandate to manufacture the product.”

Canada Makes recently reported on a project undertaken with Edmit Industries Inc. and MDA to build 3D printed Titanium parts for an innovative graphite strut structure for flight application. For more on the additive manufacturing (AM) project go to – CANADA MAKES, EDMIT & MDA TEAM UP FOR INNOVATIVE SPACE APPLICATION PARTS.

MDA-Edmit-2

3D Printed Titanium Bracket and Hub for a Satellite Graphite Strut Structure, fabricated by Edmit Industries

About Edmit
Edmit is a small-to-medium size company specializing in the manufacturing of high-end precision components and assemblies. As Innovators and researchers, EDMIT provides leading edge and innovative methods and concepts. With more than 35 years of expertise, Edmit specializes in metal additive manufacturing (3D printing) of precision metal parts for the aerospace, space and medical industries and are a key partner for research and development projects for space application. edmitinc.com

About Canada Makes
A Canadian Manufacturers & Exporters (CME) initiative, Canada Makes is a network of private, public, academic, and non-profit entities dedicated to promoting the adoption and development of additive manufacturing in Canada. For more information on Canada Makes, please visit www.canadamakes.ca

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ICTC Releases Additive Manufacturing: The Impending Talent Paradigm

www.ictc-ctic.ca.png

The Information and Communications Technology Council (ICTC) announces the release of its latest report, Additive Manufacturing: The Impending Talent Paradigm.

Additive Manufacturing (AM) (often referred to as 3D Printing) is a transformative technology that is dramatically reshaping the manufacturing industry—much in the way Uber redefined the taxi industry and Netflix disrupted the media industry.

AM is rapidly growing worldwide and is now fully recognized for its massive potential in almost every market, including automotive, aerospace, medical, and robotics, just to name a few. With new modeling techniques, applications, and a variety of printable materials, AM has transitioned, in a short number of years, from a prototype technology to an integral pillar of automated manufacturing.

It is projected that the AM market will be around $17.7 billion globally in three years, and that in the next five years the manufacturing industry will look substantially different than it does today. Such rapid change brings both opportunities and challenges to businesses, workers and policymakers.

Skilled talent is the essence of any high performing economy. The rise and adoption of AM across all industries has increased the demand for highly skilled talent in this space and has left businesses searching for better talent development and recruitment strategies.

The evidence-based analysis and recommendations in this report are intended to inform policymakers, industry and educators about the labour market impact of AM development across Canada, the state of the talent supply and demand, and how best to engage, attract and retain the necessary highly-skilled talent.  The overarching goal is to place Canada in a position to meet its digital talent requirements to be competitive in the global digital economy.

“Additive manufacturing is the new frontier for advanced and smarter industries, raising the prospects of a more competitive economy. In this rapidly developing landscape, tomorrow’s talent strategies will need to be as distributive as the technologies transforming the industries.” said Namir Anani, ICTC President & CEO.

For any questions, please contact Maryna Ivus, Senior Research Analyst, at m.ivus@ictc-ctic.ca.

To view the report, please click here.

Burloak Advances Heat Exchanger Technology

Paris, France – June 20, 2017 – Burloak Technologies, a leading Canadian additive manufacturing company, and part of the family of Samuel companies, has announced the successful completion of the first stage in the development of a new heat exchanger technology. This additive manufactured design demonstrated 44 per cent lower thermal resistance over existing designs in a controlled test. “After extensive research and many months of design simulation, the successful completion of the live experiment on Burloak’s test bed validates our design hypothesis.” stated company president Peter Adams. “We will now apply these design principals to delivering custom, thermal-management solutions to our customers.”

The objective for electronic enclosures cooling is to maintain the temperature of the semiconductor components inside within their operating range. It is typical that a few components generate the majority of heat, and it is those components that the cooling design should target. Additive manufacturing enables intricate cooling channels to be created in such a manner that maximizes heat dissipation while also targeting specific areas of the enclosure.

Burloak’s research team has modelled, built and tested many, novel geometries that can only be produced using additive manufacture and have developed a comprehensive, engineering database to create the design rules that enable the heat transfer improvements. Burloak will be displaying several of the new heat exchanger designs at the 2017 Paris Air Show and will have experts on hand to discuss specific projects at the Industry Canada Showcase Hall 3/D70 and at Samuel’s Chalet (by invitation B19).

To set up a meeting during PAS2017 to discuss your business requirements, please contact: aerospace@samuel.com or sales@burloaktech.com.

ABOUT BURLOAK TECHNOLOGIES

Burloak Technologies, part of the family of Samuel companies, is a leading supplier of highly-engineered additive manufacturing solutions for clients with demanding applications in high-tech industries worldwide. Burloak delivers high quality, lightweight, fully functional additive manufactured parts for low to medium volume applications across a range of industries including: space, aerospace, defense, energy, medical, automotive, and transportation. In-house engineering, manufacturing and metrology capabilities make Burloak one of the few full-service suppliers in the industry. Together with its clients, Burloak works to re-create component and process specifications and move additive manufacturing from a prototyping technology to a certified production technology. www.burloaktech.com

ABOUT SAMUEL, SON & CO.

Founded in 1855, Samuel, Son & Co. is a family-owned and operated, integrated network of metal manufacturing, processing and distribution divisions. With over 4,800 employees and 100+ facilities, Samuel provides seamless access to metals, industrial products and related value-added services. Supporting over 40,000 customers, we leverage our industry expertise, breadth of experience and the passion of our people to help drive success for North American business – one customer at a time. www.samuel.com

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