News

Workshop: Industrial applications of 3D – Presented by Réseau Québec-3D, Canada Makes & AON3D

This is rescheduled from June 20 to September 12, 2018

June 20th is the next in our series of additive manufacturing workshops Industrial applications of 3D hosted by Montreal’s AON3D. Réseau Québec-3D and Canada Makes are again partnering to showcase some of Canada’s leading experts in 3D printing. This half-day workshop will focus on industrial applications of the 3D technology- how 3D can help you gain an adavantge.

Topics will include; The Journey from Prototyping to Production, a look at how companies have successfully adapted AM since the 90’s, 3D Printing in construction, 3D scanning applications and more. The workshop’s goal is to enlighten you and stimulate thought on how 3D technology can be used in your business.

Recently, certain sectors have seen dramatic shifts in the way they operate. How fast can it happen? Take the U.S. hearing aid industry, it converted to 100% additive manufacturing in less than 500 days. According to one industry CEO, not one company that stuck to traditional manufacturing methods survived. Examples like this speak for themselves about the potential disruption 3D printing can have.

Join us and learn about the power of 3D printing and how companies have prospered through its adoption. 

Real business opportunities are available to those who understand how to use this powerful new tool as part of their process. The workshop offers the chance to meet face-to-face and network with some of Canada’s leaders in additive manufacturing (AM).

We look forward to seeing you, seating is limited so sign up now as our workshops sell out fast!

Date: September 12, 2018
Time: 8 a.m. – 12:00 p.m.
Location: AON3D
9494 Boul. St. Laurent Suite 600
Montreal QC, H2N 1P4

Cost: 
$25 Réseau Québec-3D & CME Canada Makes Members
$50 Non-Members

Members register here

Non-members register here

Agenda

Time Topic Speaker
8:00 – 9:00 a.m. Registration and Networking coffee  
9:00 – 9:30 a.m. Welcome Remarks & Unlocking new industrial applications in 3D printing through materials Kevin Han, CEO AON3D
9:30 – 10:00 a.m. 3D scanning and 3D printing technologies for the construction sector Martin Lavoie, Creadditive
10:00 – 10:30 a.m. Networking Break
10:30 – 11:00 a.m. 3D scanning, its applications and how it improves time to market Vincent Goudreault, 3D Metrology Expert Creaform
11:00 – 11:30 a.m. 3D Printing… the Journey from Prototyping to Production Gilles Desharnais, CEO Axis Prototype
11:30 – 12:00 p.m. Sujets concrets de pièces industrielles en impression 3D metal Cyrille Chanal, CEO FusiA Impression 3D Métal

About Réseau Québec-3D
The Réseau Québec-3D network is helping rally a community around additive manufacturing. Interested parties include stakeholders from aeronautics, ground transportation, and the energy industry, as well as mould manufacturers, machining companies, and people from the medical and dental sectors. University, college, and industry researchers are also taking part, along with 3D printing manufacturers and manufacturers and distributors of the raw materials used for 3D printing and metal-processing and composite material companies.

About AON3D
AON3D is a rapidly growing startup on a mission to put industrial 3D printing capabilities into the hands of those who need it most. Our technology has made it 10 times cheaper than before to 3D print with advanced thermoplastics, and we continue to push the boundaries on commercializing new materials for 3D printing.

Contact information:
Frank Defalco, Manager Canada Makes
Frank.defalco@cme-mec.ca

FusiA Impression 3D Métal & Groupe Meloche join forces to carry out additive manufacturing projects in the aerospace sector

FusiA Impression 3D Métal, a Canada Makes member company specialized in the 3D printing of metal parts and Groupe Meloche, a major supplier of aerostructure and aircraft engine components to original equipment manufacturers (OEMs) and Tier-1integrators, have signed a partnership agreement to carry out projects in the additive manufacturing of components for prime contractors in the global aerospace sector.

“This strategic partnership enables us to add additive manufacturing technology to our offering and gives us a competitive edge in our mission as a world-class aerospace integrator,” said Hugue Meloche, President and Chief Executive Officer, Groupe Meloche.

Already well positioned in the supply chain for aerostructure and aircraft engine component manufacturing, Groupe Meloche is now able to offer intelligent manufacturing services to all its customers. The company also specializes in manufacturing engineering, complex machining, surface treatment, painting, value-added assemblies, and non-destructive testing. Groupe Meloche is in the process of patenting a highly specialized non-destructive test bench technology.

Groupe FusiA specializes in the production of 3D printing metal parts for the aeronautics, space and defence sectors in France and Canada. Thanks to its experience and numerous R&D projects, it is today a recognized expert in additive manufacturing. Established since 2014 in Québec, the company offers, through its subsidiary FusiA Impression 3D Métal, its know-how in the 3D manufacturing of metal parts from a production facility in Greater Montréal.

“With the signing of this agreement, we are well positioned to penetrate this rapidly growing sector more rapidly thanks to Groupe Meloche’s expertise and its sustained march towards establishing a true 4.0 factory,” explains Cyrille Chanal, President of FusiA.

In recent years, Groupe Meloche has made significant investments in automation and advanced machining technologies. “3D printing is part of our goal to deliver world-class performance to our customers in terms of quality, on-time deliveries and manufacturing turnaround times,” adds Mr. Normand Sauvé, Vice President, Innovation and Infrastructure.

About Groupe Meloche (www.melocheinc.com)
Founded in 1974 in Salaberry-de-Valleyfield, Groupe Meloche provides aerostructure and aircraft engine components to original equipment manufacturers (OEM) and Tier-1 integrators through a vertical integration strategy that includes precision machining, surface treatment, painting, assembly and non-destructive testing. The company owns four production sites near Montreal, including one in Bromont and its head office in Salaberry-de-Valleyfield. It employs a total of 200 individuals who have access to modern workshops with over 45 machining and CNC turning centres. The corporation generates annual sales of more than $60 million.

About Groupe FusiA (www.fusia.fr)
Groupe FusiA specializes in the additive manufacturing (3D printing) of metal parts in France and Canada. It has gained extensive expertise in 3D printing through sustained investments in R&D since 2011 (more than 25 projects). Its know-how enables it to offer services from the design phase to production, in accordance with the aerospace sector’s highest standards. Its subsidiary, FusiA Impression 3D Métal, has been based in Québec since 2014 and has a production facility in Saint-Eustache. Groupe FusiA is also a leader in France through its subsidiary FusiA Aeroadditive, certified by the Safran Group. It recently obtained a series contracts for more than 1,000 parts from major European aerospace prime contractors.

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For more information contact
Nancy German
nancygerman@primacom.ca
514 924-4445

AMM announces partnership with Dimanex, a global enterprise for distributed 3D manufacturing

Additive Metal Manufacturing Inc. (AMM), a Canada Makes member company, is an independent Canadian 3D Printing metal service provider announced it is expanding its on-demand Electronic Warehouse replenishment capabilities by partnering with DiManEx, a Dutch Company that provides a cloud-based, end-to-end service for distributed 3D manufacturing.

This is ideal for manufacturers and parts intensive companies. The digital supply platform can be accessed remotely to initiate the production of parts with the click of a button.

AMM’s President, Norman Holesh said, “technology is now allowing companies to free up large amounts of working capital by printing parts on demand rather than filling warehouses with parts in anticipation of a demand that may never materialize.”

The Electronic Warehouse provides new solutions to existing supply chain dilemmas. A lot size of one is now a reality and broken or lost tooling a nightmare of the past.

A notable partnership was announced recently with the Royal Dutch Army, that is embedding additive manufacturing systems within its Land Systems programs and to support the missions of its Material Stock Logistics Command. They’ve already run a successful pilot on an active combat vehicle for which they’ve been able to solve problems for spare / service parts which were no longer available or had become obsolete after buying more than needed to satisfy Minimum Order Quantities.

Colonel and Head of Innovation at the Dutch Army, Robert Meeuwsen, has said, “This proves that 3D printing and other Additive Manufacturing (AM) techniques are ready for regular business operations. We hope other organizations will be open to taking this new route as well.”

‘We’ve only seen the beginning pf the impact additive manufacturing will have on industrial supply chains across the globe, supplying any part anywhere with a simple click of a button,” said Tibor van Melsem Kocsis, founder and CEO.

About Additive Metal Manufacturing Inc
AMM is a Product Design Consulting, Rapid Prototyping, Additive Metal Production independent service bureau located in Toronto, Ontario.

About DiManEx
DiManEx is a global enterprise platform for distributed 3D manufacturing. Unlike an open marketplace, we provide a dedicated cloud-based end-to-end service. Our smart platform and service combined with strong global partnerships provide the best customer results and experience.

For further information contact:

Additive Metal Manufacturing Inc – www.additivemet.com
David Slimowitz (david@additivemet.com) at 905-738-0410 ext. 2

Dimanex – www.dimanex.com
Henk Jonker (henk.jonker@dimanex.com) at +31 6 129 224 25

Finalists announced for the Ottawa Symphony Orchestra and Canada Makes’ National 3D Printed Musical Instrument Challenge

Canada Makes and the Ottawa Symphony Orchestra are pleased to announce the top three finalists for the National 3D Printed Musical Instrument Challenge:

  • Jared Kozub is an engineer from Winnipeg, Manitoba. His design is a titanium Spiral Flame Ocarina in which the finger holes are angled downwards to provide a more comfortable wrist position than traditional ocarinas.
  • Robert Hunter is a PhD candidate in Biomedical Engineering at The University of Ottawa. His design is a more ergonomic clarinet where the weight of the instrument has been moved from the right thumb to the right forearm.
  • Victor Martinez is a Designer, Instructor, Researcher from Richmond BC. He proposes a system where the chin and shoulder rest bends and adapts to the shape of the musician.

The National 3D Printed Musical Instrument Challenge asked participants to improve or design an ergonomically optimized musical instrument that leverages the power of 3D Printing (metal or polymer) for its fabrication, while remaining cost-effective. The designers were encouraged to consider how they could contribute to solving the epidemic of performance related injuries among professional musicians and music students by addressing root causes of the issue insofar as it relates to instrument design.

Applications represented regions across Canada, a variety of levels of design experience and wide-ranging innovative solutions to common health problems among musicians. The submissions were evaluated by a panel of eight adjudicators with expertise in 3D printing, music performance, and musician’s health.

“We want to do better for the next generation of musicians. 3D printing creates the opportunity to build structures that just weren’t possible before this technology. Our objective is to inspire designers, as individuals or teams, to engage in this multi-disciplinary challenge. We aim to help musicians excel in their craft, while pushing the boundaries of what is possible through improvements in design.” – Frank Defalco, Canada Makes

The winning entry will receive the KUN Prize, valued at over $35k, which includes a fabrication and fitting budget, performance of the instrument at the Ottawa Symphony Orchestra’s 2018 autumn 3D StringTheory concert, and a $5k cash prize. The KUN Prize is sponsored by Marina Kun, President of KUN Shoulder Rests Inc., and fabrication is sponsored by Precision ADM and Axis Prototype Inc.

The winner will be announced next week.

About the 3D StringTheory Project:

3D StringTheory asks:
What new instruments and sounds can we create using today’s newest technologies?

To explore the new creative possibilities that technology brings to music, the Ottawa Symphony Orchestra has commissioned Ottawa violin maker Charline Dequincey and the Industrial Technology Centre in Winnipeg to create original 3D-printed string instruments. Montreal-born composer Harry Stafylakis will write an original piece of music inspired by these new sounds. The Ottawa Symphony Orchestra will present the final product of these collective efforts in a live performance of Stafylakis’ piece, featuring the new instruments in Autumn 2018.

The project will also feature public competitions involving instrument making and design challenges for youth, university students, and professionals. The 3D Printed Musical Instrument Challenge is the first competition to be announced.

The full process of creating the 3D-printed string instruments will be documented through a video series available for the public to follow and engage with online and through social media.

3D StringTheory explores how today’s new technologies, like 3D printing, can further expand musical boundaries.

For more information and to follow our project, visit: https://ottawasymphony.com/3dstringtheory/

About Canada Makes
Canada Makes is a network of private, public, academic, and non-profit entities dedicated to promoting the adoption and development of advanced and additive manufacturing (AM) in Canada. It is an enabler and accelerator of AM-adoption in Canada. The network covers a broad range of additive manufacturing technologies including 3D printing; reverse engineering 3D imaging; medical implants and replacement human tissue; metallic 3D printing and more.

The National 3D Printed Musical Instrument Challenge is an addition to the series of Pan-Canadian 3D Printing Challenges hosted by Canada Makes. The adoption of digital manufacturing technologies such as 3D printing requires new approaches to skills and training focused on building experiential and collaborative learning.

About Marina Kun
While raising four daughters, Marina entered the world of violins and shoulder rests. In 1972 her late husband, Joseph Kun, an Ottawa-based violin and bow maker designed and patented a revolutionary shoulder rest. When Marina joined the business in 1974, she took a tiny company selling only dozens of shoulder rests and turned it into a global market leader creating a household name in the international strings world. Creating the ‘KUN’ brand almost from scratch, her company now holds dozens of global patents and has the widest product range in the industry with no less than 80% of the world.

The KUN name has become an icon in the music industry and is one of the only Canadian companies that is a major manufacturer in the music world. In 2005, Marina’s company received the Design Exchange and National Post Gold Medal for Industrial Design for the Voce rest.

Marina was designated one of Canada’s top 100 Women Entrepreneurs in 2006 by PROFIT, and Kun Shoulder Rest Inc. received the Business of the Year Award by the Canadian Lebanese Chamber of Commerce and Industry (2004).
Full text:
https://womensbusinessnetwork.ca/download.php?id=134

Media Contact:
Angela Schleihauf, Ottawa Symphony
marketing@ottawasymphony.com
613-983-7201

Additive Manufacturing 101-5: What is powder bed fusion?

(Image: 3D Hubs)

Powder Bed Fusion (Image: 3D Hubs)

  Mechanical Design Engineer and Additive Manufacturing Ph.D. student

This is the sixth article in a series of original articles that will help you understand the origins of the technology that is commonly called 3D printing. First an introduction, followed by the seven main technologies categories (binder jetting, directed energy deposition, material extrusion, material jetting, powder bed fusion, sheet lamination, vat photopolymerization) and then a design philosophy for additive manufacturing.

Powder Bed Fusion

ISO/ASTM definition: “powder bed fusion, —an additive manufacturing process in which thermal energy selectively fuses regions of a powder bed.”[1]

Powder Bed Fusion can also be known as (in alphabetical order):

➢ Direct Metal Laser Remelting or DMLR[2]

➢ Direct Metal Laser Sintering or DMLS® (EOS GmbH)[2]

➢ Direct Metal Printing or DMP (3D Systems Corporation)

➢ Electron Beam Additive Manufacturing or EBAM[3]*‡

➢ Electron Beam Melting or EBM (Arcam AB)

➢ High Speed Sintering or HSS[4]

➢ LaserCUSING® (Concept Laser GmbH)[2]

➢ Laser Metal Fusion (TRUMPF Laser Technology)

➢ Micro Laser Sintering or MLS (EOS GmbH)

➢ Selective Electron Beam Melting or SEBM[5], [6]*

➢ Selective Heat Sintering or SHS[7]

➢ Selective Laser Melting or SLM[2]

➢ Selective Laser Sintering or SLS® (3D Systems Corporation)[2]

* Occasionally used in literature for describing EBM.

‡ EBAM is officially a trademarked DED process.

Powder bed fusion contains a range of technologies, all of which have core similarities, the main three are SLS, SLM and EBM. These originated from work at the University of Texas at Austin in the early 1980s which was awarded a patent in 1989[8], [9]. In 1995, SLM and DMLS were developed in Germany as part of a project between the Fraunhofer Institute, EOS and others[10]. In 1997, Arcam AB of Sweden was founded to commercialize the idea of EBM with their first machine being sold in 2001 and delivered in 2002. HSS was invented in the UK in 2003 and shows promise of being an up and coming AM technology[4].

Figure 1: Powder Bed Fusion example setup[11]

Powder bed fusion methods all start with a powder bed, another parallel to binder jetting. A thin layer of loose powder between 0.001mm (EOS) and 0.2mm (Arcam) with an average of 0.02mm to 0.1mm is smoothly spread flat over a build platform. This layer of powder is then passed over by either a laser or electron beam which supplies significant heat to the powder. The powder is then either partially melted (sintered) or fully melted, to a point where the powder fuses to itself and to the layers below. Then the build platform changes height, a new layer of powder is deposited, and the process is repeated layer by layer until the part is complete. The main differences between all these methods are the heat source that causes melting, the environment in which the melting takes place, and the degree to which things are melted. SLS, DMLS, SLM and all other methods that contain laser in the name, use a laser to provide the thermal energy. SHS uses only a thermal print head. HSS uses an infrared lamp and a radiation absorbent material to do the sintering. EBM uses an electron beam. SLS and HSS generally work only with plastics and operate in a heated nitrogen atmosphere with the powder bed at an elevated temperature. DMLS and SLM primarily work with metals, and due to the reactive nature of some powdered metals, the process takes place in an inert oxygen-free environment with the powder bed being either at room temperature or at a low-temperature set-point. EBM works with metals and takes place in a vacuum and at elevated temperatures much closer to the metals melting temperature. SLS, HSS, and SHS all sinter the material resulting in a final part that has some porosity, but low to no residual stress in the part. Residual stress is energy contained within the material itself that causes it to deform and move[12]. This lack of residual stress allows the parts do not need any type of support system as the powder bed provides the needed supports for overhangs. Although DMLS contains sintering as part of its name, its process does involve melting and not sintering of metals. SLM, DMLS, LaserCUSING and EBM fully melt the material and can result in fully dense parts. SLM, DMLS, and LaserCUSING all can result in significant residual stress depending on materials, geometry, and laser parameters, and thus need significant support structures to hold parts down. EBM utilizes its fast scan speed to preheat the entire layer with the electron beam to just below melting before actually melting the selected portions. This not only preheats the powder but also causes the powder to become loosely aggregated and reduces dust ‘smoking’ which is a repulsive reaction of the powder once it is hit with negatively charged electrons[13], [14]. EBM results in parts that have little to no residual stress and thus uses very little if any supports.

Advantages of this process are mostly about material properties. First, there is a wide range of materials that can be processed from plastic parts like Nylon to a wide range of different metals like copper and Inconel to even ceramics. Next, parts that are fully or even partially melted can have significant strength advantages over non-melted processes as the material properties can be close to that of stock material. Then, depending on the process and material, support structures may not be needed, as the powder bed becomes the support. Build speeds can also be fast depending on materials and process, with processes that preheat the powder bed to just below melting being the quickest because it allows a very fast scan speed. Electron beam scan speeds are the fastest of any process due to the lack of mechanical parts to direct the beam. Processes that use lasers result in a high level of detail and fine features. EBM can process materials that are highly reactive in oxygen, and thus can be made quicker and cheaper than subtractive methods.

Disadvantages depend on the process; however, all of these processes can only utilize a single material in the final part. Some methods require inert gases as an additional consumable material. Layer heights are a function of the powder diameter and thus have a medium resolution in the build direction compared to other processes. EBM surface finish is generally rough and will need some post-processing in order to achieve tight tolerances. Some methods require support structures that need additional manual work to be removed from the final part. EBM requires more than an air blasting to remove unsolidified material as the remaining powder no longer acts as a light metal powder but clings together more like wet sand. Thus it needs either powder blasting, ultrasonic vibration, or mechanical methods to remove the powder, with certain geometries like deep narrow cavities being especially difficult.

References

[1] “ISO/ASTM 52900:2015(en), Additive manufacturing — General principles — Terminology,” International Organization for Standardization (ISO), Geneva, Switzerland, 2015.

[2] Gu D. D., Meiners W., Wissenbach K., and Poprawe R., “Laser additive manufacturing of metallic components: materials, processes and mechanisms,” International Materials Reviews, vol. 57, no. 3, pp. 133–164, May 2012.

[3] Gong X., Anderson T., and Chou K., “Review on Powder-Based Electron Beam Additive Manufacturing Technology,” in ASME/ISCIE 2012 International Symposium on Flexible Automation (ISFA 2012), St. Louis, Missouri, USA, 2012, p. 507.

[4] Hopkinson N. and Erasenthiran P., “High Speed Sintering – Early Research into a New Rapid Manufacturing Process,” in Proceedings of the 15th Solid Freeform Fabrication Symposium (SFF), Austin, Texas, USA, 2004, pp. 312–320.

[5] Heinl P., Rottmair A., Körner C., and Singer R. F., “Cellular Titanium by Selective Electron Beam Melting,” Advanced Engineering Materials, vol. 9, no. 5, pp. 360–364, May 2007.

[6] Lodes M. A., Guschlbauer R., and Körner C., “Process development for the manufacturing of 99.94% pure copper via selective electron beam melting,” Materials Letters, vol. 143, pp. 298–301, Mar. 2015.

[7] Baumers M., Tuck C., and Hague R., “Selective Heat Sintering Versus Laser Sintering: Comparison of Deposition Rate, Process Energy Consumption and Cost Performance,” in Proceedings of the 26th Solid Freeform Fabrication Symposium (SFF), Austin, Texas, USA, 2015, pp. 109–121.

[8] Deckard C. R., “Method and apparatus for producing parts by selective sintering,” U.S. Patent 4,863,538, 05-Sep-1989.

[9] Bourell D. L., Marcus H. L., Barlow J. W., Beaman J. J., and Deckard C. R., “Multiple material systems for selective beam sintering,” U.S. Patent 4,944,817, 31-Jul-1990.

[10] Shellabear M. and Nyrhilä O., “DMLS – Development History and State of the Art,” in Proceedings of the 4th Laser Assisted Net Shape Engineering Conference (LANE 2004): Volume 1, Erlangen, Germany, 2004, pp. 393–404.

[11] Frazier W. E., “Metal Additive Manufacturing: A Review,” Journal of Materials Engineering and Performance, vol. 23, no. 6, pp. 1917–1928, Jun. 2014.

[12] Buchbinder D., Meiners W., Pirch N., Wissenbach K., and Schrage J., “Investigation on reducing distortion by preheating during manufacture of aluminum components using selective laser melting,” Journal of Laser Applications, vol. 26, no. 1, p. 12004, 2014.

[13] Kahnert M., Lutzmann S., and Zaeh M. F., “Layer formations in electron beam sintering,” in Proceedings of the 18th Solid Freeform Fabrication Symposium (SFF), Austin, Texas, USA, 2007, pp. 88–99.

[14] Eschey C., Lutzmann S., and Zaeh M. F., “Examination of the powder spreading effect in Electron Beam Melting (EBM),” in Proceedings of the 20th Solid Freeform Fabrication Symposium (SFF), Austin, Texas, USA, 2009, pp. 308–319.

Visit Canada Makes’ Partners at MMTS

Starting May 14 till the 16th is the Montreal Manufacturing Technology Show (MMTS) at Place Bonaventure in Montreal. Produced by SME, this is Quebec’s premier event for the manufacturing sector. Every two years, more than 4,500 buyers and influencers from across the province come to see exhibits featuring over 400 companies from around the world and representing many sectors of manufacturing, which include several Canada Makes Partners.

Be sure to take in the 4th Annual Réseau Québec-3D Conference: Transforming your business model with 3D Printing on the 16th. This is the premiere AM event in Quebec and not to be missed. Click here to consult the program.

Take the time to visit our members and learn about their expertise in Additive Manufacturing (AM) and 3D Printing.

AON3D 859
Axis Prototypes 902
Cimetrix Solutions Inc 157
CMQ – Centre De Métallurgie Du Québec 903
CRIQ 800 & 905
Elliott Matsuura Canada Inc 647, 833 & 847
Machine Tool Systems Inc 547
Proto3000 Inc 512
Renishaw Canada Ltd 659
Réseau Québec-3D & Canada Makes 908
Solaxis Ingenious Manufacturing 365
Tiger Vac International Inc 955

 

Burloak announces $104 million investment in a new Additive Manufacturing Technology Centre

On May 4, 2018 the Honourable Karina Gould, Minister of Democratic Institutions, on behalf of the Honourable Navdeep Burloak TechnologiesBains, Minister of Innovation, Science and Economic Development, announced a repayable federal investment of $14 million to advanced manufacturing company Burloak Technologies. Minister Gould was joined by Eleanor McMahon, Ontario’s President of the Treasury Board who announced a $7 million provincial grant. The total value of the project is $104.7 million.

“This is great news for Burlington and for Canada’s advanced manufacturing industry. Advanced manufacturing is an important and growing sector that is contributing to our economy and creating well-paying middle class jobs. Our government’s investment in Burloak’s project will help ensure Canada remains at the forefront of advanced manufacturing technology and a globally competitive centre for innovation. ”  – The Honorable Karina Gould, Minister of Democratic Institutions.

“Additive manufacturing is a rapidly developing technology that is destined to become a multi-billion-dollar industry. Through its investment in the Burloak Technologies Advanced Manufacturing Center, the provincial government is showing its leadership and support for innovation in the manufacturing sector and is helping to establish world-class 3D printing capabilities right here in Ontario.” Peter Adams President and Co-Founder, Burloak Technologies.

This investment will help create 295 new Canadian jobs by 2026 and will enable Burloak to open a new, world-class Additive Manufacturing Technology Centre in Burlington, Ontario, that will help make Canada a world leader in additive manufacturing.

“The announcement by Burloak is a huge step for Canada’s additive manufacturing sector,” said Frank Defalco, Manager Canada Makes. “We applaud the two levels of government for coming together and supporting Canada’s emerging additive sector and we look to keep working with Burloak to make Canada’s industries leaders in the adoption of additive manufacturing.”

Additive manufacturing, also known as 3D printing, is a cheaper, faster, and more environmentally friendly method of manufacturing. 3D printed parts are lighter and often more durable than traditionally manufactured parts.

Burloak’s investment in Ontario will also generate more R&D, more collaboration with post-secondary institutions and help strengthen the region’s advanced manufacturing cluster and supply chain.

This investment is made possible through the Strategic Innovation Fund, a program designed to attract and support high-quality business investments across all sectors of the economy, by encouraging R&D that will accelerate technology transfer and commercialization of innovative products, processes and services and facilitate the growth of innovative firms. What every business needs is insurance, and they can get excellent service from One Sure Insurance.

See release – Ontario Supporting Over 80 Advanced Manufacturing Jobs in Oakville

Quick facts

  • Burloak Technologies is a division of Samuel, Son & Co. based in Mississauga, Ontario. Samuel employs 4800 people at more than 100 facilities (622 of whom are in in Ontario).
  • Canada’s manufacturing industry is an important part of the country’s economy, contributing $174 billion or 10 percent to Canada’s GDP in 2016.
  • The Strategic Innovation Fund is a flexible program that reflects the diversity of innovation in all sectors of the economy.
  • Ontario is investing up to $7 million through the Jobs and Prosperity Fund as part of a larger overall investment by Samuel, Son & Co. and Burloak Technologies valued at $80.5 million. The project is scheduled for completion by December 2022.
  • Samuel, Son & Co. is one of North America’s largest metal manufacturing, processing and distribution companies. The company has more than 5,200 employees at over 100 facilities worldwide. Its Burloak Technologies division is a leader in additive manufacturing and delivers 3D printed applications to customers across various sectors.

Canada Makes’ 3D Challenge Finalists Video Presentations

On March 21, 2018 Canada Makes announced its five finalist for the 3D Challenge. At the time we requested that each of them produce a short video to showcase their design. We can now share the videos with you (see below).

The theme of the Challenge Design solutions for a sustainable future Canada Makes invited student designers to participate in the 3D Design Competition with a focus on creating innovative tools or products that reduce our environmental footprint using additive manufacturing in tandem with conventional manufacturing approaches.

Lisa Brock and Yanli Zhu proposed the design of biodegradable packaging made from mushroom roots and agricultural waste using binder jetting additive manufacturing. The packaging design was created by optically 3D scanning the object. The data was imported into a computer aided design (CAD) software to create the custom packaging structure conforming to the unique geometry, and a lattice structure was added to reduce the amount of material required. Approximately 10% of materials used in additive manufacturing can be recycled into new plastics, and the rest are disposed. The options for disposal are landfills and incineration, both of which increase the amount of greenhouse gases. Therefore, new biobased biodegradable materials must be developed to decrease the negative environmental impacts of these additive manufacturing plastics.https://youtu.be/XKU-BHKuGZI

Gitanjali Shanbhag and Issa Rishmawi aim is to introduce light-weighting to helicopter tail designs by proposing a modi􀂡ed design, for the tail boom of Airbus H135 as an example, through Additive Manufacturing(AM). The material of interest is aluminum 2024-T3 since it is a readily available lightweight material and is cost-effective. In the optimized design, material is only applied where the loads on the tail boom are concentrated, resulting in a hollow, truss-like structure that reduces the boom weight by 63%. The results are validated using the simulation software. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=G5OkB3aykYc

Ken Nsiempba submitted a redesign of the internal boat tail support bracket to be 3D printed. This bracket is mainly used during ground processing at the base of the Atlas V payload fairing (Atlas V is an active expendable launch system of the Atlas rocket family). What makes the new bracket’s design special is its use of different manufacturing technics. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=hNeJ1kwXRZ8&feature=youtu.be

Nathaniel Claus offered a ONE BIKE concept that allows bikes to transcend limitations set by current production trends through a convertible parts system. The cycling industry moves forward at an alarming rate, more so than the automobile industry. There are 200 million bikes produced every year. That’s 5 bikes to every car produced annually and more than enough for every person born in that same year. As a result, high-end bikes are becoming increasingly expensive and lower end bikes are becoming less reliable in order to keep their prices down. This concept creates an alternative to users accumulating additional bikes saving money and reducing a rider’s impact on this planet. https://youtu.be/w9xe3pe8fYI

Haley Butler is working on developing a potato starch-based plastic 􀂡lament that is suitable for 3D printing. Starch-based plastics have the potential to be used as an environmentally friendly material for additive manufacturing. Haley chose not to submit a video.

Canada Makes will announce the overall winner of this years Canada Makes 3D Challenge at the HI-AM conference May 22, 2018 at the University of Waterloo.

We would like to thank our sponsors for their support.

Canada Makes would like to thank all those who participated and invite them to once again to try next year when we hold Canada Makes’ second 3D Challenge.

Experts in Demand: Growth in Metal Additive Manufacturing Creates Need for Professionals

Last week at Rapid + TCT in Fort Worth, Texas SME released a report “Experts in Demand: Growth in Metal Additive Manufacturing (AM) Creates Need for Professionals.” The report discusses the exponential growth in metal AM over the last decade and how medical, aerospace and automative are integrating the technology.  The report outlines how the sector’s growth has created the need for skilled professionals to run a successful operation.

Certain challenges are holding back growth for Metal AM such as the regulatory environment, capital and qualified workers.

Worldwide Metal AM system sold in 2017 saw an increase of almost 80%  over 2016, this has resulted in a step demand for skilled employees. Three main factors are driving the increases, technology development, materials development and standards development.

Martin Petrak, CEO Precision ADM

The report includes a case study by Canada Makes partner Precision ADM’s CEO Martin Petrak “Using mettle to find success with metal.”

To learn more or to download the report, visit http://www.sme.org/am3dmetalsjob/

About SMESME Canada
SME connects manufacturing professionals, academia and communities, sharing knowledge and resources to build inspired, educated and prosperous manufacturers and enterprises. With more than 85 years of experience and expertise in events, media, membership, training and development, and also through an education foundation, SME is committed to promoting manufacturing technology, developing a skilled workforce and attracting future generations to advance manufacturing. Learn more at sme.org

Canada Makes Partners enjoyed a successful Rapid + TCT

The 2018 Rapid +TCT event last week in Fort Worth, Texas proved to be a successful event for Canada Makes’ partners.

The first day of the event was highlighted by GE Additive’s unveiling of the new Arcam EBM Spectra H, a new metal additive manufacturing system, designed to handle high heat and crack prone materials.

GE Additive

The week was highlighted by a group dinner, which Terry Wohlers dropped by and met about 30 Canadians many of whom are Canada Makes partners enjoying a Mexican dinner. (see below)

See below for a quick tour of Canada Makes partners who are showing off there wares at this years Rapid +TCT.

Jesse Garant Metrology Center

Custom Prototypes

AON3D

Tiger-Vac

EOS

Mazak

Precision ADM booth 435

Tekna

Renishaw

About Rapid + TCT
RAPID + TCT is North America’s preeminent event for discovery, innovation, and networking in 3D manufacturing. Next years event will be held in Detroit May 21-23, 2019. Learn more http://www.rapid3devent.com

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