Home » Articles posted by canadamakes

Author Archives: canadamakes

Canada Makes – Canada’s Premier Additive Manufacturing Network

On behalf of the Canada Makes network, thank you for participating in this important initiative. As part of our organization’s ongoing commitment to ensuring Canadian industry is on the cutting-edge of technology and innovation, we have developed Canada Makes in order to directly network additive manufacturing companies with vendors and educational institutions.

Canada Makes is designed to facilitate dialogue through a series of events at academic institutions and industrial facilities. Participants will have the opportunity to respond to issues of the day as well as share their experiences related to additive manufacturing. Canada Makes is not targeting a particular policy, regulation, or program change, but rather it is a forum for business collaboration, and a way to find solutions to major industry challenges.

Lear more about Canada.

I sincerely thank you for your participation, insights, and support of this critical initiative. We look forward to working with you to strengthen Canada’s additive manufacturing community.

Sincerely,

Martin Lavoie

Executive Director – Canada Makes

View an interview with Martin Lavoie in the following report on 3D printing Note: (Most of this video is in French)

Sheridan Proud to be an Inaugural Partner in Canada Makes


Original article posted at the Sheridan College website HERE

September 23, 2014 – Canadian manufacturers looking to join the 3D printing revolution are about to get some assistance with the launch of www.canadamakes.ca, a national network of excellence dedicated to the adoption and development of additive manufacturing in Canada.


“Sheridan’s Centre for Advanced Manufacturing and Design Technologies (CAMDT) is one of the most sophisticated applied research labs for commercial 3D production on an academic campus in Canada,” says Dr. Jeff Zabudsky, President and CEO of Sheridan. “Through Canada Makes, we’re proud to provide SMEs across Canada with access to additive and direct digital manufacturing capabilities that would not otherwise be within their reach.”

“Additive manufacturing has the potential to revolutionize manufacturing,” says Dr. Farzad Rayegani, Director of CAMDT and Associate Dean of Mechanical and Electrical Engineering at Sheridan. “When it’s used to create the tools needed for mass production, 3D printing can accelerate a company’s product development cycle.  It allows the molds to be built and refined quickly and cost-effectively.”

Rayegani adds that the technology is also ideally suited to industries like medical and aerospace where projects are low volume and complex.  “Manufacturers are now able to turn mass production into production-on-demand. End use parts can be highly customized.  Since they’re created as they’re needed, companies can also eliminate the significant costs associated with storing inventory.”

“The global competitiveness of the Canadian manufacturing sector depends on the broad adoption of additive technologies and on the training of the next generation of designers and engineers,” said Canadian Manufacturers & Exporters President and CEO Jayson Myers. “CAMDT has the equipment, the people and the students to help guide the manufacturing sector to the next level, which makes Sheridan a natural fit as a founding partner of Canada Makes‎.”

“If Canada wants to be a maker nation, we need to get students excited about science, technology, engineering and math,” adds Rayegani.  “The perfect way to capture their imagination and build their interest and knowledge is by offering an integrated curriculum which teaches students to conceive, design, implement and operate. Additive manufacturing is the perfect tool to accelerate this process in STEM education.”

Metal Powder Report: Launch of Canadian 3D printing network


Original article published by Metal Powder Report.Net – to view the original post at their website click HERE


 

Additive manufacturing is one of those advanced manufacturing technologies that is likely to disrupt the way we are making things,” said CME President and CEO Jayson Myers. “CME is proud to take the leadership and promote its development among the Canadian manufacturing sector.”

Canada Makes has been launched in collaboration with Sheridan College’s Centre for Advanced Manufacturing and Design Technologies (CAMDT), located in Brampton, Ontario. CME and CAMDT will organize three additive manufacturing workshops at CAMDT’s facilities in the next year in order to promote the adoption of additive manufacturing among SMEs.

“CAMDT is one of the most advanced applied research labs in Canada and it has the latest technologies and software in the field of fused deposition modelling (FDM). We are proud to help make this state-of-the-art laboratory available to small and medium-sized manufacturers across the country,” Myers said.

Other areas

Canada Makes will gradually expand into other areas of additive manufacturing and members of the network will also benefit from a customized service aimed at identifying potential partners and source of funding to complete their additive manufacturing projects, from prototyping to applied and fundamental research.

 

LUXeXceL Announces New Optics 3D Printing Process and Material – To Compete With Injection Molding


Original article published by 3D Print.com – to view the original post at their website click HERE

WRITTEN BY:  ·


 

3D Printing, Canada Makes, Luxexcel

Optics printed with LUX-opticlear will have a 96.9% internal transmission, and a perfectly smooth outer surface.

One of the more impressive companies we have covered over the last year has been the Netherlands-based LUXeXceL. The company uses a unique additive manufacturing process to create crystal clear 3D printed optics for a variety of key applications. The process, which allows a photosensitive resin to settle, prior to being cured by UV lighting, has certainly garnered the attention of several major manufacturers.

Today, the company has announced several key developments which have taken 3D optics printing to the next level. According to LUXeXceL, these new developments will make 3D printing of small and mid-sized optics just as efficient, if not more efficient than injection molding techniques.

The new patform promises to provide clients with precise, quick-to-market products, which will eliminate costly tools and the inflexibility inherant with injection molding. As part of this new platform, the company has unveiled a new LUX-Opticlear printing material. This new material can be printed to heights of up to 20mm, retaining its superb optical properties. Optics printed with LUX-opticlear will have a 96.9% internal transmission, and a perfectly smooth outer surface.

“The optical quality of the new LUX-Opticlear material combined with the digital advantages of this new additive process, makes our service an affordable and attractive solution for both prototyping and smaller or mid-sized volume manufacturing of optical components” says Richard van de Vrie, Founder and CEO of LUXeXceL. “As we do not need to post process the printed products, our process is fast and scalable, enabling optics designers to walk a perfect route from fast prototyping and easy iterating, to manufacturing the exact required volumes in days.”

Additionally, the company has unveiled a new ordering platform, which is expected to be rolled out over the remainder of this year. The platform will allow customers to log on to the system 24/7, securely upload their CAD files, and be provided with a quote based on the model’s specifications.

“The new platform is equipped with software that enables the uploading of various different types of CAD files and automatically re-processes the CAD files in specially formatted print-files,” explained van de Vrie. “These new capabilities combined with the ‘One-Step-CAD-to-Optic’ manufacturing process is interesting for various industries, as new optical products and functions will arrive on stage and optics can be tailored to every application, project or even single product.”

to view the original post at their website click HERE

The 3D Opportunity Primer: The Basics of Additive Manufacturing


Original article published by Deloitte University Press – to view the original post at their website click HERE

WRITTEN BY: Mark Cotteleer, Jonathan Holdowsky & Monika Mahto


 

Additive Manufacturing

If the past is prologue, the role that additive manufacturing plays in the manufacturing value chain will likely grow in scope, scale, and complexity.

Additive manufacturing (AM), also known as 3D printing, refers to a group of technologies that create products through the addition of materials (typically layer by layer) rather than by subtraction (through machining or other types of processing).

The history of AM traces back over 30 years to 1983 and the invention of stereolithography. Since then, the technology has evolved to include at least 13 different sub-technologies grouped into seven distinct process types.

We hope this report serves as a useful primer for managers seeking to develop a basic understanding of the different technologies and processes that fall under the AM umbrella. Although not exhaustive (as the technologies are constantly evolving), we believe this report offers a thorough survey to facilitate enlightened discussion by companies interested in the AM topic.

Additive manufacturing (AM) refers to a set of technologies and processes that have been developed over more than 30 years. ASTM International, a global body recognized for the development and delivery of consensus standards within the manufacturing industry, defines additive manufacturing as:

“A process of joining materials to make objects from 3D model data, usually layer upon layer, as opposed to subtractive manufacturing methodologies.2

In common practice, the terms “AM” and “3D printing” are used interchangeably.3

The AM process traditionally begins with the creation of a three-dimensional (3D) model through the use of computer-aided design (CAD) software. The CAD-based 3D model is typically saved as a standard tessellation language (.STL) file, which is a triangulated representation of the model. Software then slices the data file into individual layers, which are sent as instructions to the AM device. The AM device creates the object by adding layers of material, one on top of the other, until the physical object is created. Once the object is created, a variety of finishing activities may be required. Depending on the material used and the complexity of the product, some parts may need secondary processing, which can include sanding, filing, polishing, curing, material fill, or painting.

To help readers appreciate how AM can aid their companies’ performance, growth, and innovation goals, we offer a detailed framework in our report 3D opportunity: Additive manufacturing paths to performance, innovation, and growth, available on Deloitte University Press.1 We also offer specific insights for key industries: 3D opportunity for aerospace and defense: Additive manufacturing takes flight (http://dupress.com/articles/additive-manufacturing-3d-opportunity-in-aerospace/); 3D opportunity for the automotive industry: Additive manufacturing hits the road(http://dupress.com/articles/additive-manufacturing-3d-opportunity-in-automotive/); and 3D opportunity in medical technology: Additive manufacturing comes to life (http://dupress.com/articles/additive-manufacturing-3d-opportunity-in-medtech/). For a complete catalog of material available from Deloitte on additive manufacturing, please seehttp://dupress.com/collection/3d-opportunity.

View the full study HERE

3D Opportunity for the Automotive Industry: Additive Manufacturing Hits the Road


Original article published by Deloitte University Press – to view the original post at their website click HERE

WRITTEN BY: Craig A. Giffi, Bharath Gangula & Pandarinath Illinda


 

Additive Manufacturing, Automotive

New developments in additive manufacturing processes will likely benefit production within the automotive industry as well as alter traditional manufacturing and supply chain pathways.

Significant advances in additive manufacturing (AM) technologies, commonly known as 3D printing, over the past decade have transformed the potential ways in which products are designed, developed, manufactured, and distributed.1 For the automotive industry, these advances have opened doors for newer designs; cleaner, lighter, and safer products; shorter lead times; and lower costs. While automotive original equipment manufacturers (OEMs) and suppliers primarily use AM for rapid prototyping, the technical trajectory of AM makes a strong case for its use in product innovation and high-volume direct manufacturing in the future. New developments in AM processes, along with related innovations in fields such as advanced materials, will benefit production within the automotive industry as well as alter traditional manufacturing and supply chain pathways.

Global automotive manufacturing has high barriers to entry, especially at the top where the four largest OEMs accounted for a third of the global industry revenue of over $2 trillion in 2013.3 On the other hand, the $1.5 trillion parts and accessories manufacturing sector is characterized by high competition among a large number of smaller players.4 To survive and succeed in such an environment, companies should focus on specific capabilities that can lead to greater competitiveness.5 As authors, we believe there are two areas where AM will have the greatest influence on competition between automakers and potentially be a game changer:

  1. As a source of product innovation: AM can produce components with fewer design restrictions that often constrain more traditional manufacturing processes. This flexibility is extremely useful while manufacturing products with custom features, making it possible to add improved functionalities such as integrated electrical wiring (through hollow structures), lower weight (through lattice structures), and complex geometries that are not possible through traditional processes.6Furthermore, new AM technologies are increasingly able to produce multimaterial printed parts with individual properties such as variable strength and electrical conductivity. These AM processes play an important role in creating faster, safer, lighter, and more efficient vehicles of the future.
  2. As a driver of supply chain transformation: By eliminating the need for new tooling and directly producing final parts, AM cuts down on overall lead time, thus improving market responsiveness. In addition, since AM generally uses only the material that is necessary to produce a component, using it can drastically reduce scrap and drive down material usage. Furthermore, AM-manufactured lightweight components can lower handling costs, while on-demand and on-location production can lower inventory costs. Finally, AM can support decentralized production at low to medium volumes. All these AM capabilities combined allow companies to drive significant change within the supply chain—including cost reductions and the improved ability to manufacture products closer to customers, reduce supply chain complexity, and better serve consumer segments and markets without the need for extensive capital deployment.

Together, product innovation and supply chain transformation have the potential to alter the business models of automotive companies. The extent to which the potential offered by AM is harnessed depends on the path chosen by individual companies.

View the full study HERE

Citing demand from small businesses, UPS expands 3D printing

You are being redirected to the Original article at fortune.com. If you are not redirected, please click here.

First America, Now Canada — Looking to Network a Nation of Makers. Who’s Next?

BY ON WED, SEPTEMBER 24, 2014 ·


The Maker phenomenon is spreading, directly North it seems. Not only is America making, but Canada is too, now, as Canadian Manufacturers & Exporters (CME) has launched Canada Makes. Like its southern counterpart — America Makes — this is a national network of excellence dedicated to the adoption and development of additive manufacturing in the home nation.

This article has been re-posted with the permission of the author – to visit their webpage, please click HERE


America Makes was the rebranded effort of the National Additive Manufacturing Innovation Institute (NAMII) in the US, which was certainly a mouthful when the acronym was not used, and nowhere near as inspiring to the nation’s increasing number of makers and young talent. Since the rebranding — and redoubling of efforts at every level of the making hierarchy in the US — America Makes really seems to have caught the imagination both in the homeland and further afield. I’m thinking it won’t be long before we see other national networks — set up and/or rebranded. ‘UK Makes’ doesn’t quite have the same ring to it, but given the surge in nationalism among these fair isles ‘England Makes’ could work, and Scotland can Make with devolved making power if it so chooses. Germany Makes maybe, Italy Makes, Australia Makes, China Makes — I could go on, but you get the idea.

However, right now Canada Makes, and according to Jayson Myers, CME’s President and CEO: “Additive manufacturing is one of those advanced manufacturing technologies that is likely to disrupt the way we are making things. CME is proud to take the leadership and promote its development among the Canadian manufacturing sector.”

Canada Makes has launched in collaboration with Sheridan College’s Centre for Advanced Manufacturing and Design Technologies (CAMDT), located in Brampton, ON. CME and CAMDT will organize three additive manufacturing workshops at CAMDT’s facilities in the next year in order to promote the adoption of additive manufacturing among SMEs. The first workshop is scheduled for October 16, 2014.

“CAMDT is one of the most advanced applied research labs in Canada and it has the latest technologies and software in the field of Fused Deposition Modeling (FDM). We are proud to help make this state-of-the-art laboratory available to small and medium-sized manufacturers across the country,” Myers said.

“Sheridan routinely partners engineering students with local businesses in need of 3D printing work,” said Director of CAMDT and Associate Dean of Mechanical and Electrical Engineering Dr. Farzad Rayegani.“SMEs gain access to equipment they otherwise couldn’t afford and benefit from product and process innovation. The students gain invaluable insight into the design challenges that manufacturing businesses face daily.”

Canada Makes will reportedly expand gradually into other areas of additive manufacturing, including metal 3D printing, and printable electronics. In addition to technology demonstration and training workshops, members of the network will also benefit from a customized service aimed at identifying potential partners and source of funding to complete their additive manufacturing projects, from prototyping to applied and fundamental research.

3D Printers Helping to Save Toddlers Mind

On a regular summer evening last year, Erin Mandeville was out running errands with her five-month-old baby, Gabriel. Close to 4PM, she noticed her infant’s eyes roll back in quick succession. It was the first of Gabriel’s many episodes of infantile spasms that would follow.

Spasms or epileptic seizures can be catastrophic for young children. Doctors at Boston Children’s Hospital tried every route and medicine to help Gabriel as his seizures progressed aggressively.

“He was missing huge milestones in his childhood,” said Mandeville.

Doctors eventually suggested a hemispherectomy, a complicated operation that disconnects the healthy half of the brain from the one causing seizures. “I didn’t know how invasive it would be,” Gabriel’s mother said. “But, if it was going to make him have a better life, it was an easy choice to make.”

Mandeville’s choice was made easier knowing that Gabriel would be the first infant whose brain would be replicated by a 3D printer for a practice run prior to the operation.

A hemispherectomy is “one of the most challenging operations in pediatric epilepsy surgery,” says Dr. Joseph Madsen, director of the epilepsy program at Boston Children’s. A dress rehearsal is beneficial even for the most highly experienced surgeons. “This is a printed version that the surgeon can hold, cut, manipulate, and look for things,” he says, holding Gabriel’s printed brain in his hand. For surgeons-in-training, the simulation is a blessing. “No one wants to be the first person to get a hemispherectomy from a surgeon, ever,” he adds.

The 3D print of Gabriel’s brain was developed by the Simulator Program at the hospital. The model is printed in soft plastic with a precision of 16 microns per layer; blood vessels are set in contrast color for easier navigation. Gabriel’s parents were privy to the process and anticipated complications. Gabriel’s subsequent surgery earlier this year took close to 10 hours, and went according to plan.

“Surgical preparation via simulation allows surgeons to hit the ground a lot faster,” says Dr. Peter Weinstock, director of the Simulator Program. “We can’t be prepared for every possibility, but we can chop off a large number of complications.”

Though medical simulations are nothing new, the Simulator Program surpasses conventional systems with next-generation mannequins and 3D printing. The team behind the program includes surgeons, specialists, radiologists, and engineers, and is currently gathering data to validate its implications on surgical times, anesthetic times, and patient safety.

WE CAN CHOP OFF A LARGE NUMBER OF COMPLICATIONS.

Within a year of its inception, the project has developed close to 100 prints — 20 percent of those have made their way into operating rooms. Dr. Weinstock suggests that in the future, on-demand anatomy printing could make its way into emergency rooms to meet the needs of trauma cases.

“The technology is coming,” he said. “The question is: how do we develop and make use of the technology that will have an immediate effect on how we take care of children?”

Gabriel, now 18 months, is seizure-free. Challenges can be expected. “But, kids’ brains are so resilient,” his mother says. “He’s already re-wired himself. He’s starting to hit the milestones he missed — he wakes up smiling every day.”

Maker Space at University of Ottawa

Technology has a profound impact on our quality of life. Some new technologies allow us to stay in contact with our loved ones, while others save us money or reduce unnecessary delays. The pace of technological change means that once in a while an innovation or entirely new form of technology drastically changes everything.

For our generation, I am confident that technology is additive manufacturing and 3D printing.

Additive manufacturing not only changes the way way we make things, but it affects the underlying business model of countless manufacturers, suppliers, and customers. Far beyond the plant floor, the impact of additive manufacturing will reach our communities, our schools, and our children.

In September I visited the University of Ottawa’s newly created Maker Space, a dedicated space for students, entrepreneurs, and the community to learn about 3D printing and its countless applications. Young people and adults are limited only by their own ingenuity, as they are encouraged to imagine, design and encode, and build plastic components and  to every day problems.

On its own, there is nothing particularly revolutionary about the facilities at the University of Ottawa Maker Space. This educational facility is one of thousands that exist across North America. Even the fifth generation 3D printers used by the participants, state of the art as they might be, are limited to printing simple plastic components or toys. Nevertheless, the trajectory of this emerging industry is what holds the potential for a truly revolutionary technology.  It is not inconceivable to imagine that with only a few years of research and development these same students could be using 3D printers to produce replacement human tissue, fully functional computer components, or new ultra-light structural materials for aerospace.

As it happens, the University of Ottawa Maker Space has a summer camp for children under the age of 10. During my visit, these kids were standing on chairs to see the printers at work. They were so interested in printing their Minecraft figurines that they had completely forgotten that this camp is a educational exercise. By the time these children enter the work force, the advanced 3D printers they’re currently using will have been replaced much the same as smart phones have replaced the clunky cellular telephones that once occupied the glove box of so many cars.

Watch these kids. They won’t just change the way things are made. They will change the way we trade and compete in the future economy.