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Canada Makes 3D Challenge 2018-19


Canada Makes is again offering its Pan-Canadian 3D Printing Design Challenge for postsecondary students enrolled in a Canadian college or university. Winners to be announced in the Spring of 2019.

Canada Makes 3D Challenge Trophy

Lisa Brock and Yanli Zou of the University of Waterloo are now part of the Canada Makes trophy’s history

Last year’s challenge was “Design solutions for a sustainable future” and is again this year. Five finalist from last year’s challenge each received $1,000 for their design. Learn more about the designs at Canada Makes announces finalists for its 3D Challenge.

The adoption of digital manufacturing technologies such as 3D printing requires new approaches to skills and training focused on building experiential and collaborative learning. To foster this objective, the Canada Makes 3D Challenge will challenge university/college teams to design a part and compete for a full one-year paid internship from a Burloak Technologies and cash prizes.

Theme: Design solutions for a sustainable future

Description: Additive manufacturing is empowering new ways to re-think design and fabrication through innovative materials, optimized structures and enhanced functionality. There is currently a drive to think about how our society is changing in the wake of population growth and sustainability concerns. Canada Makes invites student designers to participate in the 3D Design Competition with a focus on creating innovative tools or products that reduce our environmental footprint using additive manufacturing in tandem with conventional manufacturing approaches.

Such examples include (and are not limited to):

  • lightweight structures or new designs of automotive or aerospace components that reduce overall weight and fuel consumption
  • innovative components that optimize fuel or energy consumption
  • energy harvesting devices with innovative features
  • multi-purpose objects that simplify everyday life and reduce waste
  • wearable tools or objects that enhance mobility efficiency and reduce waste

Pre-Register is closed

Phase I – Students who wish to participate must pre-register by November 30, 2018 indicating their intent to submit a final design.

Phase II – Participants will submit a design based on the provided criteria. These designs will be analyzed and evaluated via simulation with the top finalists announced, recognized and awarded their cash prize. Deadline for submissions is February 22, 2019.

Phase III – The top five finalists will have their design fabricated and tested, and will be invited to either make a live or video presentation and have a chance at more prizes including a chance at a one-year paid internship at Burloak Technologies.

Registration Process

After Pre-registrations Student/Team (no more than 3 students per team) will submit the following by February 22, 2019:

  • Cover sheet
  • 150 word description/summary
  • STL files and source files from any CAD program
  • An image of the current product design (if applicable) and a detailed description of the changes
  • Business case (800 word):
  • Justification of the product redesign, value added as measured by reduced
  • Time to produce
  • Cost impact
  • Sustainability
  • Energy consumption or renewable energy generation
  • Reduced materials
  • Promoting green design
  • Participants should define the unmet need in society or explain the waste in current solutions
  • Precisely what is being proposed
  • Why it is am improvement over existing products

Judges will choose the top 5 finalists and Canada Makes will arrange to fabricate their designs to be showcased at a final event in the spring of 2019. The finalist/teams will receive a cash prize and a chance at a one-year paid internships at Burloak Technologies.

The Challenge will have clear winning criteria and be judged on the merit of their application.

Submitted designs will be evaluated via simulation, and the top five designs will be selected for fabrication and testing based on the required criteria. The winning entries will best satisfy all of the performance criteria.

Eligibility Rules and Submission Guidelines

Terms of Acceptance

Responsibility for Submission

Privacy

Contact: Frank Defalco frank.defalco@cme-mec.ca

Ottawa Symphony Orchestra and Canada Makes Announce the Winner of the National 3D Printed Musical Instrument Challenge

Ottawa, 14 June, 2018 – Ottawa Symphony Orchestra and Canada Makes are pleased to announce Robert Hunter as the winner of the National 3D Printed Musical Instrument Challenge for his design for clarinet and brace which improve the ergonomics of the instrument by redistributing the weight of the instrument to larger muscle groups compared to traditional instruments. The award will be presented to Robert Hunter in person at Ottawa Symphony’s Open House event on Thursday, June 14th between 5-7pm at Dominion Chalmers (355 Cooper St.) in Ottawa.

“I was interested in this competition because of my combined background in biomedical engineering including biomechanics, 3D CAD design, and music. I used to play clarinet a lot in high school, and when I would practice for long periods my right thumb would become sore from supporting the weight of the instrument. So when I read about this competition, this problem immediately sprang to mind for something I could try and solve.” – Robert Hunter


The National 3D Printed Musical Instrument Challenge asked participants to improve or design an ergonomically optimized musical instrument that leverages the power of 3D printing (metal or polymer) for its fabrication, while remaining cost-effective. The designers were encouraged to consider how they could contribute to solving the epidemic of performance related injuries among professional musicians and music students by addressing root causes of the issue insofar as it relates to instrument design.

“Hunter’s design directly addresses an ergonomic injury risk to the musician and his proposal included an assessment of both playing aesthetic and technical demands. Bravo!” – Dr. John Chong.

“While music lifts the soul, many musicians – professionals and amateurs alike – struggle to perform due to injury. This challenge was an invitation to designers to employ new technology to the benefit of musician’s health. We were so pleased with all the creative ideas we received, and specifically, to award the KUN Prize to Robert Hunter.”– Alain Trudel

Applicants represented regions across Canada, a variety of levels of design experience and wide-ranging innovative solutions to common health problems among musicians. The submissions were evaluated by a panel of eight adjudicators with equal weighting between disciplines of 3D printing, music performance, and musicians’ health.

As the winner, Robert Hunter will receive the KUN Prize, valued at over $35k, which includes a fabrication and fitting budget, a 5min piece of music commissioned for the instrument, performance of the instrument at the Ottawa Symphony Orchestra’s 3D StringTheory concert on November 4th, and a $5k cash prize. The KUN Prize is sponsored by Marina Kun, President of KUN Shoulder Rests Inc., and fabrication is sponsored by Precision ADM and Axis Prototype Inc.

List of Adjudicators
Dr. John Chong, Medical Director of the Musicians’ Clinic of Canada
Judith Robitaille, musicians’ occupational therapist and professor at Université de Sherbrooke
David Saint John, Director of Innovation at Linamar Corporation
Gilles Desharnais, President of Axis Prototypes Inc.
Alain Trudel, Music Director of Ottawa Symphony Orchestra
Mary-Elizabeth Brown, Bielak-Hartman Concertmaster Chair of Ottawa Symphony Orchestra
Ben Glossop, Principal Bassoonist of Ottawa Symphony Orchestra
Travis Mandel, Principal Trumpet of Ottawa Symphony Orchestra

About the 3D StringTheory Project:

3D StringTheory asks:
What new instruments and sounds can we create using today’s newest technologies?

To explore the new creative possibilities that technology brings to music, the Ottawa Symphony Orchestra has commissioned Ottawa violin maker Charline Dequincey and the Industrial Technology Centre in Winnipeg to create original 3D-printed string instruments. Montreal-born composer Harry Stafylakis will write an original piece of music inspired by these new sounds. The Ottawa Symphony Orchestra will present the final product of these collective efforts in a live performance of Stafylakis’ piece, featuring the new instruments on November 4th, 2018.

The project will also feature public competitions involving instrument making and design challenges for youth, university students, and professionals. The 3D Printed Musical Instrument Challenge is the first competition to be announced.

The full process of creating the 3D-printed string instruments will be documented through a video series available for the public to follow and engage with online and through social media.

3D StringTheory explores how today’s new technologies, like 3D printing, can further expand musical boundaries.

For more information and to follow our project, visit: https://ottawasymphony.com/3dstringtheory/

This is one of the 200 exceptional projects funded through the Canada Council for the Arts’ New Chapter program. With this $35M investment, the Council supports the creation and sharing of the arts in communities across Canada.

About Canada Makes
Canada Makes is a network of private, public, academic, and non-profit entities dedicated to promoting the adoption and development of advanced and additive manufacturing (AM) in Canada. It is an enabler and accelerator of AM-adoption in Canada. The network covers a broad range of additive manufacturing technologies including 3D printing; reverse engineering 3D imaging; medical implants and replacement human tissue; metallic 3D printing and more.

The National 3D Printed Musical Instrument Challenge is an addition to the series of Pan-Canadian 3D Printing Challenges hosted by Canada Makes. The adoption of digital manufacturing technologies such as 3D printing requires new approaches to skills and training focused on building experiential and collaborative learning.

About Marina Kun

While raising four daughters, Marina entered the world of violins and shoulder rests. In 1972 her late husband, Joseph Kun, an Ottawa-based violin and bow maker designed and patented a revolutionary shoulder rest. When Marina joined the business in 1974, she took a tiny company selling only dozens of shoulder rests and turned it into a global market leader creating a household name in the international strings world. Creating the ‘KUN’ brand almost from scratch, her company now holds dozens of global patents and has the widest product range in the industry with no less than 80% of the world.

The KUN name has become an icon in the music industry and is one of the only Canadian companies that is a major manufacturer in the music world. In 2005, Marina’s company received the Design Exchange and National Post Gold Medal for Industrial Design for the Voce rest.

Marina was designated one of Canada’s top 100 Women Entrepreneurs in 2006 by PROFIT, and Kun Shoulder Rest Inc. received the Business of the Year Award by the Canadian Lebanese Chamber of Commerce and Industry (2004).
Full text: https://womensbusinessnetwork.ca/download.php?id=134

Media Contact:
Angela Schleihauf, Ottawa Symphony
marketing@ottawasymphony.com

613-983-7201

Canada Makes 3D Challenge Trophy, Concept to Product

View the following video showing the process of using both additive and subtractive manufacturing to go from a concept to a product. Thank you to our friends at Renishaw for sharing this wonder video.

The trophy was recently awarded to the team of Lisa Brock and Yanli Zhu from the University of Waterloo and their design of biodegradable packaging made from mushroom roots. canadamakes.ca/canada-makes-ann…eam-3d-challenge/

The award was presented during the first Conference of NSERC Network for Holistic Innovation in Additive Manufacturing (HI-AM) at the University of Waterloo.

Winning team of Yanli Zhu and Lisa Brock of the University of Waterloo with Frank Defalco of Canada Makes

Students were asked to focus on creating innovative tools or products that reduce our environmental footprint using additive manufacturing in tandem with conventional manufacturing approaches.

Lisa Brock and Yanli Zhu proposed the design of biodegradable packaging made from mushroom roots and agricultural waste using binder jetting additive manufacturing. The packaging design was created by optically 3D scanning the object. Approximately 10% of materials used in additive manufacturing can be recycled into new plastics, and the rest are disposed. The options for disposal are landfills and incineration, both of which increase the amount of greenhouse gases. Therefore, new biobased biodegradable materials must be developed to decrease the negative environmental impacts of these additive manufacturing plastics. https://youtu.be/XKU-BHKuGZI

 

Canada Makes Announces first ever winning team for the 3D Challenge

Waterloo, Ontario May 22, 2018 – Canada Makes is very pleased to announce the first ever recipients of the Canada Makes 3D Challenge award. The team of Lisa Brock and Yanli Zhu from the University of Waterloo and their design of biodegradable packaging made from mushroom roots best met the criteria of the Challenge, Design solutions for a sustainable future.

“We had contestants from PEI to BC with wonderfully innovative designs and if ideas like this years winning entry is any indication of future designs Canada will most certainly be a World leading innovator in additive manufacturing,” Frank Defalco, Manager Canada Makes

The award was presented during the first Conference of NSERC Network for Holistic Innovation in Additive Manufacturing (HI-AM) at the University of Waterloo.

Winning team of Yanli Zhu and Lisa Brock of the University of Waterloo with Frank Defalco of Canada Makes

Students were asked to focus on creating innovative tools or products that reduce our environmental footprint using additive manufacturing in tandem with conventional manufacturing approaches.

Lisa Brock and Yanli Zhu proposed the design of biodegradable packaging made from mushroom roots and agricultural waste using binder jetting additive manufacturing. The packaging design was created by optically 3D scanning the object. Approximately 10% of materials used in additive manufacturing can be recycled into new plastics, and the rest are disposed. The options for disposal are landfills and incineration, both of which increase the amount of greenhouse gases. Therefore, new biobased biodegradable materials must be developed to decrease the negative environmental impacts of these additive manufacturing plastics. https://youtu.be/XKU-BHKuGZI

We thank all participants of the first ever Canada Makes 3D Challenge. The finalists were; Gitanjali Shanbhag and Issa introduced a design for light-weighting a helicopter tail designs for the tail boom of Airbus H13. Ken Nsiempba submitted a redesign of an internal boat tail support bracket. Nathaniel Claus offered a ONE BIKE concept that allows bikes to transcend limitations set by current production trends through a convertible parts system. Haley Butler is working on developing a potato starch-based plastic 􀂡lament that is suitable for 3D printing. See the finalists’ presentations. canadamakes.ca/canada-makes-3d-…eo-presentations

Renishaw Canada, Burloak Technologies, Altair, Precision ADM, AMM, CAMufacturing, Innotech Alberta, Cimetrix, CRIQ and ISED.

We would also like to thank our partners for their support, without it we would not have been able to make the Canada Makes 3D Challenge a reality.

About HI-AM
The NSERC/CFI HI-AM Network has been conceived to work on innovative solutions to address the challenges associated with metal AM processes/products and to equip Canada for the era of Industry 4.0 and “digital-to-physical conversion.” All HI-AM Network participants meet once a year to present their research findings to the other research teams within the Network and the representatives of our industrial partners. Hosted by a different institution each year, the conference provides a great networking opportunity for the graduate students and PDFs to get to know their colleagues – future additive manufacturing experts of Canada! conference.nserc-hi-am.ca

About the 3D Challenge
Canada Makes holds a yearly Pan-Canadian 3D Printing Challenge for any postsecondary students enrolled in a Canadian college or university. Students in Canada can help change the World with a new idea that uses 3D Printing and win cash prizes and a chance at one of two one-year paid internships! The adoption of digital manufacturing technologies such as 3D printing requires new approaches to skills and training focused on building experiential and collaborative learning. To foster this objective, the Canada Makes 3D Challenge will challenge university/college teams to design a part and compete for a full one-year paid internship from a Burloak Technologies. canadamakes.ca/events/canada-makes-3d-challenge/

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Finalists announced for the Ottawa Symphony Orchestra and Canada Makes’ National 3D Printed Musical Instrument Challenge

Canada Makes and the Ottawa Symphony Orchestra are pleased to announce the top three finalists for the National 3D Printed Musical Instrument Challenge:

  • Jared Kozub is an engineer from Winnipeg, Manitoba. His design is a titanium Spiral Flame Ocarina in which the finger holes are angled downwards to provide a more comfortable wrist position than traditional ocarinas.
  • Robert Hunter is a PhD candidate in Biomedical Engineering at The University of Ottawa. His design is a more ergonomic clarinet where the weight of the instrument has been moved from the right thumb to the right forearm.
  • Victor Martinez is a Designer, Instructor, Researcher from Richmond BC. He proposes a system where the chin and shoulder rest bends and adapts to the shape of the musician.

The National 3D Printed Musical Instrument Challenge asked participants to improve or design an ergonomically optimized musical instrument that leverages the power of 3D Printing (metal or polymer) for its fabrication, while remaining cost-effective. The designers were encouraged to consider how they could contribute to solving the epidemic of performance related injuries among professional musicians and music students by addressing root causes of the issue insofar as it relates to instrument design.

Applications represented regions across Canada, a variety of levels of design experience and wide-ranging innovative solutions to common health problems among musicians. The submissions were evaluated by a panel of eight adjudicators with expertise in 3D printing, music performance, and musician’s health.

“We want to do better for the next generation of musicians. 3D printing creates the opportunity to build structures that just weren’t possible before this technology. Our objective is to inspire designers, as individuals or teams, to engage in this multi-disciplinary challenge. We aim to help musicians excel in their craft, while pushing the boundaries of what is possible through improvements in design.” – Frank Defalco, Canada Makes

The winning entry will receive the KUN Prize, valued at over $35k, which includes a fabrication and fitting budget, performance of the instrument at the Ottawa Symphony Orchestra’s 2018 autumn 3D StringTheory concert, and a $5k cash prize. The KUN Prize is sponsored by Marina Kun, President of KUN Shoulder Rests Inc., and fabrication is sponsored by Precision ADM and Axis Prototype Inc.

The winner will be announced next week.

About the 3D StringTheory Project:

3D StringTheory asks:
What new instruments and sounds can we create using today’s newest technologies?

To explore the new creative possibilities that technology brings to music, the Ottawa Symphony Orchestra has commissioned Ottawa violin maker Charline Dequincey and the Industrial Technology Centre in Winnipeg to create original 3D-printed string instruments. Montreal-born composer Harry Stafylakis will write an original piece of music inspired by these new sounds. The Ottawa Symphony Orchestra will present the final product of these collective efforts in a live performance of Stafylakis’ piece, featuring the new instruments in Autumn 2018.

The project will also feature public competitions involving instrument making and design challenges for youth, university students, and professionals. The 3D Printed Musical Instrument Challenge is the first competition to be announced.

The full process of creating the 3D-printed string instruments will be documented through a video series available for the public to follow and engage with online and through social media.

3D StringTheory explores how today’s new technologies, like 3D printing, can further expand musical boundaries.

For more information and to follow our project, visit: https://ottawasymphony.com/3dstringtheory/

About Canada Makes
Canada Makes is a network of private, public, academic, and non-profit entities dedicated to promoting the adoption and development of advanced and additive manufacturing (AM) in Canada. It is an enabler and accelerator of AM-adoption in Canada. The network covers a broad range of additive manufacturing technologies including 3D printing; reverse engineering 3D imaging; medical implants and replacement human tissue; metallic 3D printing and more.

The National 3D Printed Musical Instrument Challenge is an addition to the series of Pan-Canadian 3D Printing Challenges hosted by Canada Makes. The adoption of digital manufacturing technologies such as 3D printing requires new approaches to skills and training focused on building experiential and collaborative learning.

About Marina Kun
While raising four daughters, Marina entered the world of violins and shoulder rests. In 1972 her late husband, Joseph Kun, an Ottawa-based violin and bow maker designed and patented a revolutionary shoulder rest. When Marina joined the business in 1974, she took a tiny company selling only dozens of shoulder rests and turned it into a global market leader creating a household name in the international strings world. Creating the ‘KUN’ brand almost from scratch, her company now holds dozens of global patents and has the widest product range in the industry with no less than 80% of the world.

The KUN name has become an icon in the music industry and is one of the only Canadian companies that is a major manufacturer in the music world. In 2005, Marina’s company received the Design Exchange and National Post Gold Medal for Industrial Design for the Voce rest.

Marina was designated one of Canada’s top 100 Women Entrepreneurs in 2006 by PROFIT, and Kun Shoulder Rest Inc. received the Business of the Year Award by the Canadian Lebanese Chamber of Commerce and Industry (2004).
Full text:
https://womensbusinessnetwork.ca/download.php?id=134

Media Contact:
Angela Schleihauf, Ottawa Symphony
marketing@ottawasymphony.com
613-983-7201

Canada Makes announces finalists for its 3D Challenge

Montreal March 21, 2018 – Canada Makes announced its five finalist for the 3D Challenge at the Design for Additive Manufacturing workshop at McGill.

The finalist are; Lisa Brock University of Waterloo of Waterloo, Haley Butler University of Prince Edward Island, Gitanjali Shanbhag also of the University of Waterloo, Ken Nsiempba McGill University and Nathaniel Claus Emily Carr University of Art and Design. Congratulation to theses five students for their innovative design and concepts. They will be receiving a prize of $1,000 and a a chance at a one-year paid internship.

The theme of the Challenge Design solutions for a sustainable future Canada Makes invited student designers to participate in the 3D Design Competition with a focus on creating innovative tools or products that reduce our environmental footprint using additive manufacturing in tandem with conventional manufacturing approaches.

 

Lisa Brock proposed the design of biodegradable packaging made from mushroom roots and agricultural waste using binder jetting additive manufacturing. The packaging design was created by optically 3D scanning the object. The data was imported into a computer aided design (CAD) software to create the custom packaging structure conforming to the unique geometry, and a lattice structure was added to reduce the amount of material required.

Haley Butler is working on developing a potato starch-based plastic 􀂡lament that is suitable for 3D printing. Starch-based plastics have the potential to be used as an environmentally friendly material for additive manufacturing.

Approximately 10% of materials used in additive manufacturing can be recycled into new plastics, and the rest are disposed. The options for disposal are landfills and incineration, both of which increase the amount of greenhouse gases. Therefore, new biobased biodegradable materials must be developed to decrease the negative environmental impacts of these additive manufacturing plastics.

Gitanjali Shanbhag’s aim is to introduce light-weighting to helicopter tail designs by proposing a modi􀂡ed design, for the tail boom of Airbus H135 as an example, through Additive Manufacturing(AM).

The material of interest is aluminum 2024-T3 since it is a readily available lightweight material and is cost-effective. In the optimized design, material is only applied where the loads on the tail boom are concentrated, resulting in a hollow, truss-like structure that reduces the boom weight by 63%. The results are validated using the simulation software.

Ken Nsiempba submitted a redesign of the internal boat tail support bracket to be 3D printed. This bracket is mainly used during ground processing at the base of the Atlas V payload fairing (Atlas V is an active expendable launch system of the Atlas rocket family).

What makes the new bracket’s design special is its use of different manufacturing technics.

 

Nathaniel Claus offered a ONE BIKE concept that allows bikes to transcend limitations set by current production trends through a convertible parts system. The cycling industry moves forward at an alarming rate, more so than the automobile industry. There are 200 million bikes produced every year. That’s 5 bikes to every car produced annually and more than enough for every person born in that same year. As a result, high-end bikes are becoming increasingly expensive and lower end bikes are becoming less reliable in order to keep their prices down. This concept creates an alternative to users accumulating additional bikes saving money and reducing a rider’s impact on this planet.

Canada Makes would like to thank all those who participated and invite them to once again to try next year when we hold Canada Makes second 3D Challenge or try our current 3D Challenge open to all Canadian residents. The National 3D Printed Musical Instrument Challenge.

In the coming weeks, we will announce the overall winner of this years Canada Makes 3D Challenge.

We would like to thank our sponsors for their support.

 

Ottawa Symphony Orchestra & Canada Makes launch a National 3D Printed Musical Instrument Challenge

Ottawa Symphony Orchestra and Canada Makes are pleased to announce a National 3D Printed Musical Instrument Challenge to improve or design an ergonomically optimized musical instrument that leverages the power of 3D Printing (metal or polymer) for its fabrication, while remaining cost-effective. The competition, open to all Canadian citizens and permanent residents, runs from 1 March, 2018 to 15 April, 2018 at midnight EDT.

There is an epidemic of performance injuries among professional musicians and music students. Prestigious music schools in Canada and internationally have responded to this issue through preventative education and bringing medical professionals to campus. The 3D Printed Musical Instrument Challenge offers an opportunity to address root causes of the issue insofar as it relates to instrument design.

“We want to do better for the next generation of musicians. 3D printing creates the opportunity to build structures that just weren’t possible before this technology. Our objective is to inspire designers, as individuals or teams, to engage in this multi-disciplinary challenge. We aim to help musicians excel in their craft, while pushing the boundaries of what is possible through improvements in design.” – Frank Defalco, Canada Makes

This design challenge encourages innovation in the design of musical instruments that integrate the latest science in ergonomics and the power of 3D printing for manufacturing.

“3D printing offers a whole new world of what could be possible in instrument creation. During the Industrial Revolution, major changes were made to instruments providing them with a greater range of expression and with more control over how loudly and softly they could play. This profoundly changed the way composers wrote music.

Today, with 3D printing, we want to see what kinds of instruments can be created with this new technology, and the new music it inspires today’s composers to create.” – Maestro Alain Trudel.

The winning entry will receive the KUN Prize, valued at over $35k, which includes a fabrication and fitting budget, performance of the instrument at the Ottawa Symphony Orchestra’s 2018 autumn 3D StringTheory concert, and a $5k cash prize. The KUN Prize is sponsored by Marina Kun, President of KUN Shoulder Rests Inc., and fabrication is sponsored by Precision ADM and Axis Prototype Inc. 

For more information and to be part of our project, visit: ottawasymphony.com/3dchallenge/

About the 3D StringTheory Project:

3D StringTheory asks:
What new instruments and sounds can we create using today’s newest technologies?

To explore the new creative possibilities that technology brings to music, the Ottawa Symphony Orchestra has commissioned Ottawa violin maker Charline Dequincey and the Industrial Technology Centre in Winnipeg to create original 3D-printed string instruments. Montreal-born composer Harry Stafylakis will write an original piece of music inspired by these new sounds. The Ottawa Symphony Orchestra will present the final product of these collective efforts in a live performance of Stafylakis’ piece, featuring the new instruments in Autumn 2018.

The first 3D StringTheory prototype (photo credit: Daniel Crump)

The project will also feature public competitions involving instrument making and design challenges for youth, university students, and professionals. The 3D Printed Musical Instrument Challenge is the first competition to be announced.

The full process of creating the 3D-printed string instruments will be documented through a video series available for the public to follow and engage with online and through social media.

3D StringTheory explores how today’s new technologies, like 3D printing, can further expand musical boundaries.

About Marina Kun
While raising four daughters, Marina entered the world of violins and shoulder rests. In 1972 her late husband, Joseph Kun, an Ottawa-based violin and bow maker designed and patented a revolutionary shoulder rest. When Marina joined the business in 1974, she took a tiny company selling only dozens of shoulder rests and turned it into a global market leader creating a household name in the international strings world. Creating the ‘KUN’ brand almost from scratch, her company now holds dozens of global patents and has the widest product range in the industry with no less than 80% of the world.

The KUN name has become an icon in the music industry and is one of the only Canadian companies that is a major manufacturer in the music world. In 2005, Marina’s company received the Design Exchange and National Post Gold Medal for Industrial Design for the Voce rest.

Marina was designated one of Canada’s top 100 Women Entrepreneurs in 2006 by PROFIT, and Kun Shoulder Rest Inc. received the Business of the Year Award by the Canadian Lebanese Chamber of Commerce and Industry (2004).
Full text: https://womensbusinessnetwork.ca/download.php?id=134

About Axis Prototype
As one of Canada’s premier 3D printing companies, Axis Prototype offer a wide range of rapid prototyping services that turn digital models into 3D prototypes via additive manufacturing technologies such as FDM, SLS, SLA and DMLS. Prototyping services.

About Precision ADM
Precision ADM Inc. is a global engineering and manufacturing solutions provider that uses Additive Manufacturing, also known as 3D Printing, as a core technology, complimented by multi-axis machining to manufacture high value components and devices for the medical, aerospace, energy, and industrial sectors. Precision ADM has created a comprehensive Advanced Digital Manufacturing™ process which includes Design Support, Engineering, Manufacturing and Finishing. Precision ADM is ISO 13485:2016 certified and headquartered in Winnipeg, Manitoba.

About Canada Makes
Canada Makes is a network of private, public, academic, and non-profit entities dedicated to promoting the adoption and development of advanced and additive manufacturing (AM) in Canada. It is an enabler and accelerator of AM-adoption in Canada. The network covers a broad range of additive manufacturing technologies including 3D printing; reverse engineering 3D imaging; medical implants and replacement human tissue; metallic 3D printing and more.

The National 3D Printed Musical Instrument Challenge is an addition to the series of Pan-Canadian 3D Printing Challenges hosted by Canada Makes. The adoption of digital manufacturing technologies such as 3D printing requires new approaches to skills and training focused on building experiential and collaborative learning. 

Media Contact:
Angela Schleihauf, Project Managermarketing@ottawasymphony.com
613-983-7201

Available for interview:

  • Alain Trudel, Artistic Advisor and Principal Guest Conductor, Ottawa Symphony Orchestra
  • Frank Defalco, Manager, Canada Makes
  • Angela Schleihauf, Project Manager, 3D StringTheory, Ottawa Symphony Orchestra

National 3D Printed Musical Instrument Challenge

Canada Makes and the Ottawa Symphony Orchestra are launching a new Canada-Wide 3D Printing Challenge to improve or design an ergonomically optimized musical instrument that leverages the power of 3D Printing (metal or polymer) for its fabrication and remains cost-effective. The competition, open to all Canadian residents, is sponsored by Marina Kun, President of KUN Shoulder Rests Inc and the fabrication is sponsored by Precision ADM and Axis Prototype Inc.

The winning entry will collect the KUN Prize (valued at $36,500) which includes:

  • Up to a $5,000 Fabrication Budget (sponsored by Precision ADM and Axis Prototype Inc);
  • Up to a $5,000 Fitting Budget;
  • Integration of a specific 5-minute segment for the instrument in the “3D String Theory” concert in the autumn of 2018 (valued at $20,000);
  • Up to $1,500 in travel and accommodation costs to attend the “3D StringTheory” concert in Ottawa;
  • One pair of tickets to attend the “3D StringTheory” concert in autumn of 2018;
  • Opportunity to present at the instrument’s first public performance; and
  • A $5,000 cash prize.

The Challenge Begins on March 1st, 2018, and concludes on April 15th at midnight, EST.

Competition Information:

  • Applicant must be a Canadian Citizen or Permanent Resident
  • Submissions must include:
    • The proposed design (including a 3D STL or STEP model);
    • The expected performance of the design (maximum 500 words);
    • The expected acoustical performance of the instrument (maximum 500 words);
    • The ergonomic improvements for the performer (maximum 500 words); and
    • The fabrication process and materials (maximum 500 words)
  • Submissions can be made by individuals or teams. However, only 1 pair of concert tickets will be awarded to the winning entry, and the travel and accommodation budget to attend the concert is limited to $1500.
  • Subject to the challenge conditions, the winner will get to keep the instrument fabricated

Submitted designs will be evaluated on the design criteria and the top three designs will be selected for discussion with a technical committee. The winning entry must satisfy all performance criteria.

Following review by the Technical Committee, a winner will be selected. The winning designer will have their design fabricated and tested for musical and ergonomic performance. The designer will be supported with a fabrication and fitting budget to realize a functioning instrument to be delivered no later than June 30, 2018.

Design criteria:
4.1          The design may be for a new instrument, or an improvement on an existing instrument.
4.2          The instrument must be expected to provide a musical performance deemed acceptable for a professional performance. Specifically, the instrument is expected to:

  • reliably and readily produce a sound when struck, blown/buzzed, or plucked/bowed; and
  • produce consistent pitches when the same note is struck, blown/buzzed, or plucked/bowed.

4.3          The design must have improved ergonomics as compared to a similar, existing instrument.

4.4          The design must integrate the use of 3D Printing (metal or polymer) for the fabrication in whole, or in parts, of the instrument.

4.5          The design must achieve a total instrument cost which is financially viable, taking into consideration the $5,000 fabrication budget, and the $5,000 fitting budget.

See Competition Rules for full Terms and Conditions

Key dates
Expression of Interest: 11:59 PM ET, Sunday, March 18, 2018
Deadline for Submissions: 11:59 PM ET, Sunday, April 15, 2018
Results of Technical and Artistic Review: Wednesday, May 9, 2018
Winner notification: Saturday, May 12, 2018
Delivery of Functioning Instrument: Saturday, June 30, 2018

See Competition Rules for full details regarding Expression of Interest and Submissions

Submit Expression of Interest to Artistic_Operations@ottawasymphony.com
Submit proposed design (including a 3D STL or STEP model) to Artistic_Operations@ottawasymphony.com through Dropbox

Click here to Submit Application Form

 Precision ADMAxis Prototype

Canada Makes

Canada Makes launches National 3D Challenge for Canada’s students

Canada Makes is launching its first Pan-Canadian 3D Printing Challenge for postsecondary students enrolled in a college or university in Canada. Students in Canada can change the World with a new idea that is 3D Printed and win cash prizes and a chance at one of two one-year paid internships!

Canada Makes 3D Challenge

The Challenge begins on November 22, 2017, and concludes March 10, 2018. 

The Chair for this years Challenge Farzad Rayegani, Dean, School of Applied Technology at Humber College offered this, “I have always been encouraged by the innovative solutions students come up with when encouraged. I know Canada’s students are up to the challenge and will create something special for Canada Makes 3D Challenge.”

“Canada Makes understands how imperative skills development is to our fast emerging additive manufacturing sector and skills development is exactly the goal of the Canada Makes 3D Challenge,” said Frank Defalco, Manager of Canada Makes. “Additive Manufacturing offers plenty of opportunity for imaginative design solutions for a sustainable future, I look forward to seeing our students’ imagination at work.”

The adoption of digital manufacturing technologies such as 3D printing requires new approaches to skills and training focused on building experiential and collaborative learning. To foster this objective, the Canada Makes 3D Challenge will challenge individuals or teams from universities and colleges to design a part and compete for a full one-year paid internship from Burloak Technologies as well as cash prizes.

Theme of the 3D Challenge: Design solutions for a sustainable future
Description: 3D Printing or Additive Manufacturing (AM) is empowering new ways to re-think design and fabrication through innovative materials, optimized structures and enhanced functionality. There is currently a drive to think about how our society is changing in the wake of population growth and sustainability concerns.

Canada Makes invites student designers to participate in the 3D Design Competition with a focus on creating innovative tools or products that reduce our environmental footprint using additive manufacturing in tandem with conventional manufacturing approaches.

Such examples include and are not limited to:

  • Lightweight structures or new designs of automotive or aerospace components that reduce overall weight and fuel consumption
  • Innovative components that optimize fuel or energy consumption
  • Energy harvesting devices with innovative features
  • Multi-purpose objects that simplify everyday life and reduce waste
  • Wearable tools or objects that enhance mobility efficiency and reduce waste

The Challenge will have clear winning criteria and be judged on the merit of their application.

Submitted designs will be evaluated via simulation, and the top five designs will be selected for fabrication and testing based on the required criteria. The winning entries will best satisfy all of the performance criteria.

Phase I – Participants will submit a design based on the provided criteria. These designs will be analyzed and evaluated via simulation with the top finalists announced, recognized and awarded their prize of $1,000. Deadline for submissions is EXTENDED to March 10th, at midnight EST.

Phase II – The top five finalists will have their design fabricated and tested, and will be invited to either make a live or video presentation and have a chance at more prizes including a chance at one of two one-year paid internships at Burloak.

Click here for more information and to register

Canada Makes has two interactive guides, the Metal Additive Process Guide & Metal Additive Design Guide, which are designed to assist in designing for metal additive manufacturing (AM), feel free to use it to inspire your design. canadamakes.ca/funding/metal-additive-process-design-guides

Contact: Frank Defalco frank.defalco@cme-mec.ca

http://canadamakes.ca/canada-makes-3d-challenge/

Promotional poster for Canada Makes 3D Challenge