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Canada Makes’ Metal Additive Demonstration Program to successfully conclude

Canada Makes will soon successfully conclude the forth round of its Metal Additive Demonstration Program. The program is well on its way to completing 60 projects this year through the engagement of 100 companies all interested in metal additive manufacturing (AM). Proving once again how very popular this program is with large and small companies from across the country.

The Metal Additive Demonstration Program, delivered by Canada Makes with funding from NRC-IRAP, has a goal to help Canadian companies increase their awareness and assist in understanding the various advantages metal AM technologies offer.

“I am proud to say that we have done projects with companies from all provinces and even one territory,” said Frank Defalco, Manager Canada Makes. “Canada Makes has helped bring to life several AM applications in a variety of sectors and I know we will continue working with companies to deliver innovative ideas that will help shape the future of manufacturing.”

How the Metal Additive Demonstration Program works?
Canada Makes assists in assessing the needs of manufacturers and how best AM can fit into their business model. Some have needs like the fabrication of obsolete legacy parts no longer available, AM offers a relatively inexpensive solution. Others are tooling companies looking to improve productivity and gaining a competitive edge by adopting conformal cooling.

Canada Makes then introduces eligible companies projects to leading Canadian service providers of metal AM technologies who form the working group for delivery of parts. Hailing from different parts of the country, these experts provide participating companies advice and guidance on the design of a part as well as the opportunities in adopting AM to their process.

One of the primary goals of the program is for Canada’s industry to learn about the cost savings associated with AM, and how best they can take advantage of the main areas where AM excels at; light-weighting of parts, parts consolidation and complexity of design, the sweet-spots for metal AM.

“Certain parts do not make sense to use additive manufacturing for, not all problems can be solved through 3D printing but plenty can,” added Defalco. “It is knowing were to use this powerful new tool and that is what we are trying to do with this program.”

Be they SMEs or larger corporations, AM is changing how we build things and this program is there to help them learn about the disruptions coming to their sector but also de-risks their initial trials of this exciting technology. The results will create awareness and encourage the adoption of AM technology, thus improving Canada’s manufacturing and exporting sectors and our global competitiveness, resulting in new technology skills and increased employment opportunities in Canada.

Onstream-PIG

Onstream Pipeline Inspection Gauge (PIG)

Since the start of the program, late 2014, Canada Makes engaged with over 200 Canadian companies and over this time we reported on some of the successful projects. Here are some of the successful projects reported on over the past few years. Starting with the recent article The future of manufacturing for the energy sector is being redefined, Onstream’s Director of Technology Stephen Westwood said this about their experience with the program. “Whilst 3D printing is almost competitive on existing parts the benefits are truly reaped when designing new parts. The hard part becomes letting go of your prejudices regarding what can and can not be made based on years of experiences with machining.”

spinner/impeller

spinner/impeller

Metal Additive Manufacturing (AM) Demonstration program completes first project
Back in 2015, Burloak Technologies completed the first project of the program, a spinner/impeller to be used in a production-logging tool to measure flow. For optimum efficiency it is important the part is as light as possible allowing an quicker change of speed when a change of flow is detected. As well the part needs to be chemical resistant to improve corrosion resistance to the well fluid encountered in hostile environments.

Design improved “Venturi Cup” for Melet Plastics

Precision ADM, Melet Plastics & Canada Makes partner on conformal cooling project
Precision ADM recently completed a conformal cooling mold project that developed an improved “Venturi Cup” for Melet Plastics. One of the major factors contributing to the deformation of molded plastic parts is a lack of uniform heat distribution throughout molds. Various areas of the final part created by a mold cool at different rates creating internal stresses and deformations.

MDA spacecraft interface brackets for an antenna

Canada Makes, Fusia & MDA team up for space-bound part 
Various satellite manufacturers are using additive manufacturing to reduce the cost and time required to build spacecraft parts. 3D printing offers new possibilities for manufacturers of satellites. The building of parts with additive manufacturing allows new capabilities not available using conventional manufacturing, although it can be expensive and difficult so it is crucial to use the technology correctly where it offers true benefits. The parts are spacecraft interface brackets for an antenna and been optimised for a flight project.

Procter & Gamble Stainless Steel AM part

P&G and AMM partner with Canada Makes’ Metal Additive Demonstration Program
Procter & Gamble Belleville Plant partnered with Additive Metal Manufacturing Inc. (AMM) and Canada Makes to explore building new customized parts using additive manufacturing (AM). The example piece of work is printed to serve the combined purposes to deliver fluid to designated locations with the four extended legs while minimizing disturbance to the flow that it merges in. The vast metallurgy choices also provide a wide spectrum of chemical/environmental resistance. This illustrated part was printed in Stainless Steel taking advantage of its good anti-corrosion performance. 

Small to medium-sized enterprises (SMEs) form the majority of the businesses participating in the program. Under the current challenging economic conditions and with strong competition from low-cost countries, SMEs are interested in adapting advanced manufacturing technologies, such as additive manufacturing, to improve their competitiveness. NRC-IRAP’s financial support enables Canada Makes to work with these SMEs to organize projects and build momentum in Canada, allowing companies to see the advantages of AM technologies and improve the performance of our manufacturers to compete globally.

Canada Makes intends to continue offering this program if the powers that be agree. We hope to confirm this in the coming weeks, so be sure to keep returning to Canada Makes’ website or subscribe to our newsletter (see home page to subscribe) and stay informed about Canada’s AM sector.

Through the delivery of the program, it quickly became apparent that newcomers engaged to participate in this emerging technology shared many of the same questions and concerns. Therefore, Canada Makes developed, with its partners, two interactive guides the Metal Additive Process Guide & Metal Additive Design Guide designed to assist businesses new to metal AM who want to learn about process and designing for metal AM. The Guides are easy to use, interactive and offer useful information for the adoption of this technology.

Access is free although we request that you register. Thank you and enjoy!

Metal Additive Design GuideMetal Additive Process Guide

If you are interested in the program, please contact
Frank Defalco
frank.defalco@cme-mec.ca
(613) 875-1674

Canada Makes Additive Manufacturing Forum delivers

HAMILTON, May 26, 2016 – Yesterday, Canadian Manufacturers & Exporters’ (CME) Canada Makes hosted its second successful Canada Makes Additive Manufacturing Forum at Mohawk College in Hamilton. Leading off the event was a CME Industrie 2030 roundtable with Greg Fergus, Parliamentary Secretary to the Minister of Innovation, Science and Economic Development, Filomena Tassi, MP, Hamilton West-Ancaster-Dundas and industry leaders in additive manufacturing.

CME Rountable Greg Fergus

Greg Fergus, Parliamentary Secretary to the Minister of Innovation, Science and Economic Development listening to industry leaders in additive manufacturing

“The roundtable discussion on additive manufacturing and innovation reinforced the need for a national strategy on the future of manufacturing in Canada,” stated Jayson Myers, CME President & CEO. “Canadian companies are creating and have access to world leading technologies, but the mainstream of Canadian industry are not leveraging these technologies to their fullest capabilities to drive their businesses forward.”

Nigel Southway Canada Makes AM Forum

Nigel Southway, AMM “Be a disrupter or become disrupted”

Following the roundtable, Greg Fergus was the opening keynote speaker for Canada Makes Additive Manufacturing Forum at Mohawk College. This one-day event, sponsored by BDO Canada and Renishaw, featured both Canadian and international leaders in the additive manufacturing sector. Following last year’s inaugural success, the event continued to offer insight and expertise designed to assist industry in the adoption of additive manufacturing and 3D printing to their process.

“The forum was very well received and the information offered invaluable to Canada’s additive manufacturing sector,” said Frank Defalco, Manager of Canada Makes. “Canada Makes will continue to host similar events with the goal of bringing the very best in additive manufacturing available in Canada and around the world.”

Canada Makes would like to thank all attendees especially our group of expert speakers who shared their knowledge on additive manufacturing:
Edward D. Herderick, GE
Mark Kirby, Renishaw Canada
Nigel Southway, Additive Metal Manufacturing (AMM)
Andrew Good, Jesse Garant Metrology Center
Fabian Riss, Airbus Defense and Space
Bertrand Jodoin, University of Ottawa
Paul Boucher, BDO Canada
Ed Bernard, Crest Mold Technology Inc.
Irina Pushkareva, CanmetMATERIALS

About CME
CME is Canada’s largest trade and industry association, and the voice of manufacturing and global business in Canada. Founded in 1871, CME represents more than 10,000 leading companies nationwide, and – through various initiatives, including the establishment of the Canadian Manufacturing Coalition – touches more than 100,000 companies from coast to coast, engaged in manufacturing, international trade, and service-related industries.

About Canada Makes
A CME initiative, Canada Makes is a network of private, public, academic, and non-profit entities dedicated to promoting the adoption and development of additive manufacturing in Canada. For more information on Canada Makes, please visit www.canadamakes.ca

About Industry 2030
Industrie 2030 aims to double manufacturing output and value added exports by 2030. Through a series of cross-country consultations, we will create a roadmap and implementation strategy to help us achieve this goal. The roadmap and implementation plan will be released at CME’s National Summit in Ottawa in October. www.industrie2030.ca.

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Trade Mission: Canada Makes to visit the UK

Canada Makes is leading a trade mission to the UK this coming June 6th.  The delegation will visit institutions using metal additive manufacturing with a particular emphasis on aerospace.

Following Canada Makes’ successful trade mission to Germany this past January, it was decided more international trade missions for Canada’s additive manufacturing sector would be good business.

“The Canada Makes Trade Mission to Germany was a great way for our company to connect with international additive manufacturing leaders,” said Martin Petrak, the President and CEO of Precision ADM. “We also took the opportunity to meet with other Canadian companies interested in collaborating on national and international business opportunities.”

This mission includes a full four-day agenda, including visits to Renishaw, GKN Aerospace, the Manufacturing Technology Centre (MTC), The Nuclear Advanced Manufacturing Research Centre and Advanced Manufacturing Research Centre AMRC both at the University of Sheffield and likely Jaguar.

In addition to your own travel and accommodation costs, Canada Makes/CME will charge an administration fee of $500.

A limited number of spaces are available on a first-come-first serve basis.

Contact Frank Defalco for more information and to apply for the trade mission:
(613) 238-8888 ext:2267
frank.defalco@cme-mec.ca

Read about our highly successful trade mission to Germany here.

About Canada Makes:

Canada Makes is a network of private, public, academic, and non-profit entities dedicated to promoting the adoption and development of additive manufacturing in Canada. For more information on Canada Makes, please visit www.canadamakes.ca

Nova Scotia Community College joins Canada Makes

OTTAWA –Nova Scotia Community College Canada Makes welcomes, as a new member, Nova Scotia Community College (NSCC), as a Centre of Excellence for additive manufacturing.

Equipped with a Renishaw AM 250 3D Metal printer, the school provides excellent additive manufacturing skills and experience to their students and industry partners in advancing the additive manufacturing industry.

“NSCC partnership with Canada Makes helps promote new advanced manufacturing capabilities from coast to coast,” said Frank Defalco, Manager of Canada Makes. “Canada Makes is proud to include NSCC’s experience and leadership to our additive manufacturing network.”

“Additive manufacturing is a fast emerging and evolving component of the advanced manufacturing arena,” said Abid Ahmad, Academic Chair, Mechanical & Industrial Technologies/Aviation Institute/Applied Research. “Joining Canada Makes will expand NSCC’s network and allow us to learn from each other as we continue to develop and share additive manufacturing skills and knowledge.”

About NSCC:
NSCC has 13 campuses in communities across the province which offer over 120 programs in five academic schools, reflecting labour market needs and opportunities in Nova Scotia. NSCC is committed to graduating students with leading-edge skills and knowledge who are immediately prepared to use their talents in their work and communities.

About Canada Makes:
Canada Makes is a network of private, public, academic, and non-profit entities dedicated to promoting the adoption and development of additive manufacturing in Canada. For more information on Canada Makes, please visit www.canadamakes.ca

CARIC and NSERC Launch New AM Research Project with the EU

CARIC and NSERC, together with the European Commission, launches three collaborative research projects on crucial research areas for the aerospace sector

MONTREAL, Feb. 2, 2016 /CNW Telbec/ – The Consortium for Aerospace Research and Innovation in Canada (CARIC) and Natural Sciences and Engineering Research Council of Canada (NSERC) are pleased to announce the launch of three collaborative research projects with the European Commission. The approved research projects include the following:

  • Additive Manufacturing Optimization and Simulation Platform for repairing and re-manufacturing of aerospace components – AMOS;
  • Electromagnetic Platform for lightweight Integration/Installation of electrical systems in Composite Electrical Aircraft – EPICEA;
  • Super-IcePhobic Surfaces to Prevent Ice Formation on Aircraft – PHOBIC2ICE.

These research projects are the result of extensive dialogue between Canadian and European experts, requiring the close cooperation of 30 partners, half from Canada and half from Europe, and involving eight countries, including France, the United Kingdom, Poland, Germany, Italy, Sweden, Spain, and the Netherlands.

Denis Faubert, President and CEO of CARIC, applauds this collaboration with major international organizations and extols its benefits for the Canadian aerospace industry. “CARIC is proud to be part of a league of major global players in pursuit of excellence worldwide. The innovation of Canadian business has been recognized and, coupled with European expertise, will be propelled even further, contributing to our country’s technological footprint,” said Mr. Faubert.

“Canada’s world-class aerospace industry is important to the Canadian economy as both an investor in innovation and a creator of high-skilled jobs across the country,” said the Honourable Navdeep Bains, Minister of Innovation, Science and Economic Development. “The Government of Canada welcomes today’s announcement and remains committed to supporting such collaborations as a way of inspiring new, innovative technologies that will help Canada continue its leadership in the aerospace industry.”

“NSERC is pleased to be involved in this important partnership with CARIC and the European Commission. These three projects will accelerate academia-industry collaboration between Canada and the European Union. Moving towards 2020, NSERC will continue to build multi-lateral, international science-based partnerships. Going global in research and innovation is an important aspect of NSERC’s strategic plan,” said Dr. B. Mario Pinto, NSERC President.

About CARIC

The Consortium for Aerospace Research and Innovation in Canada (CARIC) is a non-profit organization established with the Government of Canada’s financial support. Its mission is to foster the collaboration of researchers in aerospace, universities, colleges and research centres, and support initiatives that promote impactful, responsive aerospace R&D. www.caric.aero

About NSERC

NSERC invests over $1 billion each year in natural sciences and engineering research in Canada. Our investment delivers discoveries, valuable world-firsts in knowledge claimed by a brain trust of over 11,300 professors, world-leading researchers in their fields. Our investments enable partnerships and collaborations that connect industry with discoveries and the people behind them. Researcher-industry partnerships established by NSERC help inform R&D, solve scale-up challenges and reduce the risks of developing high-potential technology.

Our investments provide scholarships and hands-on training experience for the next generation of science and engineering leaders in Canada, almost 30,000 post-secondary students and post-doctoral fellows.

SOURCE: Consortium for Aerospace Research and Innovation in Canada (CARIC)

Canada Makes hosted by EOS in Germany

Canada Makes’ trade mission to Germany included a highly anticipated visit to EOS GmbH Electrox Optical Systems headquarters located in Munich. With 25 years of experience EOS is one of the most appreciated companies in the Additive Manufacturing and industrial 3D printing world and is a member of Canada Makes.

“EOS’s facilities are superb and very impressive,” said Frank Defalco, Manager of Canada Makes who lead the trade mission to Germany. ” Their expertise is what make EOS such a valued member to Canada Makes and we are very pleased to have had the chance to meet with them on this mission.”

EOS

Canadian delegates standing in front of an EOS M 290 at EOS headquarters in Germany

EOS offers e-Manufacturing solutions as well as easy and cost-effective entry solutions for companies looking to enter into the world of AM.

Canada Makes was also able to visit to FIT Additive Manufacturing Group, a group specialized in innovative solutions in the field of additive manufacturing ranging from Rapid Prototyping to serial production, software, and hardware development since 1995.

About EOS

EOS is a world leading technology and quality leader for high-end solutions in the area of additive manufacturing (AM). The company, which was founded in 1989, is a pioneer and global leader in the area of direct metal laser sintering, and also a provider of a leading polymer technology. For these industrial 3D printing processes, EOS offers a modular solutions portfolio that consists of systems, software, materials, as well as technical and AM consulting services. EOS is the partner of choice for industrial AM-based production, and provides long-term solutions for industry. Customers using these solutions are able to take advantage of a technology that is heralding a paradigm shift: light-weight structures, cost reductions based on functional integration, product customization and accelerated product development and production.

About FIT Additive Manufacturing Group

FIT Technology Group specializes in innovative solutions in the field of additive manufacturing. Ranging from Rapid Prototyping to serial production, software, and hardware development: they are able to provide all services under one roof quickly and reliably.

About Canada Makes

Canada Makes is a network of private, public, academic, and non-profit entities dedicated to promoting the adoption and development of advanced and additive manufacturing in Canada. The network covers a broad range of additive manufacturing technologies including 3D printing; reverse engineering 3D imaging; medical implants and replacement human tissue; metallic 3D printing; printable electronics; 3D printing with electronics embedded, Industry 4.0, and more.

Visit to Airbus Group Innovations

During the trade mission to Germany, Canada Makes visited the Ludwig Bölkow Campus (LBC), a research and technology hub for innovation in aerospace and security manufacturing, and APWorks, an additive manufacturing SME focused in the aerospace industry.

The LBC is a consortium including Siemens, Airbus Group, Technische Universität München, and more. By innovating green technologies, public security, autonomous systems, and more, the site is standing firmly before its reputation as an accomplished group.

The Canadian group toured the campus’ facilities and technologies, noteworthy for both pragmatism and capability.

Airbus Group Innovations - Ludwig Boelkow Campus

Canada Makes delegation visits Airbus Group Innovations at the Ludwig Boelkow Campus in Munich Germany

“That the facilities are impressive is nothing short of accurate,” said Frank DeFalco, the Manager of Canada Makes who is leading the tour. “We are fortunate to have such great hosts to show us this truly innovative space.”

Canada Makes’ mission is focused on visiting manufacturers and innovators on behalf of their Canadian counterparts to build relationships that keep the Canadian economy competitive and vibrant.

Canada Makes is proud to have been kindly hosted by Alexander Mager of Airbus Group Innovations during the Canadian trade mission to Germany.

DMG Mori: Technology for the future

On January 26, 2016, the capabilities of new German technology were demonstrated to Canada Makes and Canadian delegates by DMG Mori, a leading international manufacturer of lathes, machining centres, multi-axis turning centers, and grinders who have adopted additive manufacturing technology.

The potential for additive manufacturing is being pressed from all sides by the new technology. One example is the DMG Mori Lastertech 65 3D, a 5-axis milling machine with the ability to work ten times the speed of current powder bed technologies.

“What these machines are capable of is truly astonishing,” says Frank DeFalco, Manager for Canada Makes who is leading the trade mission. “Partnerships between Canadian and German industry leaders ensures that information about these processes is flowing in both directions.”

DGM MORI

Canada Makes delegation fronting DGM MORI’s Lasertec 65 3D

The highlights of the machine’s technical capabilities are worth note. From the DMG Mori website:

  • MILL + LASER: Full 5-axis milling machine from DECKEL MAHO in stable monoBLOCK®-design; flexible integration of a laser head by HSK-interface
  • Complete machining in milling quality with fully automated change between milling and laser operation
  • Laser deposition welding with powder nozzle: 10-times faster vs. powder-bed-process
  • Large working room for workpieces up to ø 600 mm, 400 mm height and max. 600 kg

Canada Makes’ trade mission is focused on bringing leading ideas and technologies to Canadian additive manufacturers to ensure that our Canadian economy stays connected and competitive.

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Maker Space at University of Ottawa

Technology has a profound impact on our quality of life. Some new technologies allow us to stay in contact with our loved ones, while others save us money or reduce unnecessary delays. The pace of technological change means that once in a while an innovation or entirely new form of technology drastically changes everything.

For our generation, I am confident that technology is additive manufacturing and 3D printing.

Additive manufacturing not only changes the way way we make things, but it affects the underlying business model of countless manufacturers, suppliers, and customers. Far beyond the plant floor, the impact of additive manufacturing will reach our communities, our schools, and our children.

In September I visited the University of Ottawa’s newly created Maker Space, a dedicated space for students, entrepreneurs, and the community to learn about 3D printing and its countless applications. Young people and adults are limited only by their own ingenuity, as they are encouraged to imagine, design and encode, and build plastic components and  to every day problems.

On its own, there is nothing particularly revolutionary about the facilities at the University of Ottawa Maker Space. This educational facility is one of thousands that exist across North America. Even the fifth generation 3D printers used by the participants, state of the art as they might be, are limited to printing simple plastic components or toys. Nevertheless, the trajectory of this emerging industry is what holds the potential for a truly revolutionary technology.  It is not inconceivable to imagine that with only a few years of research and development these same students could be using 3D printers to produce replacement human tissue, fully functional computer components, or new ultra-light structural materials for aerospace.

As it happens, the University of Ottawa Maker Space has a summer camp for children under the age of 10. During my visit, these kids were standing on chairs to see the printers at work. They were so interested in printing their Minecraft figurines that they had completely forgotten that this camp is a educational exercise. By the time these children enter the work force, the advanced 3D printers they’re currently using will have been replaced much the same as smart phones have replaced the clunky cellular telephones that once occupied the glove box of so many cars.

Watch these kids. They won’t just change the way things are made. They will change the way we trade and compete in the future economy.