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Canada Makes leads trade mission to Formnext Germany Nov.13 – 17

Canada MakesNext week, starting November 14th Canada Makes will be leading its third additive manufacturing (AM) trade mission since 2016. This time it is to Formnext in Frankfurt, Germany. Formnext is the leading trade fair for Additive Manufacturing and the next generation of intelligent manufacturing solutions. It focuses on the efficient realization of parts and products, from their design to serial production. Formnext shows the future of innovative manufacturing.

Canada Makes’ trade mission to Formnext offers our delegates an unrivalled opportunity to learn about this rapidly expanding technology. Delegates meet, learn and build strong relationships during the mission. Past missions have highlighted the importance these relationships have in forging future partnerships and initiatives in building Canada’s AM sector.

Joining Canada Makes in Frankfurt Germany are Equispheres inc., CAMufacturing Solutions inc., Precision ADM, Linamar, Reko International Group Inc., NRC, CRIQ, Kilmarnock Enterprise, Plasai and Red River College.

Canada Makes would like to thank the following companies for agreeing to meet with our delegation.

Canada Makes Formnext Agenda

Tuesday

Nov. 14

11:00 – 12:00 EOS booth 3.1-G50
Tuesday

Nov. 14

14:30 – 15:30 Fraunhofer booth 3.0-F50
Wednesday

Nov. 15

11:00 – 12:00 Additive Industries

Hall 3.0, booth 3.0-F40

Wednesday

Nov. 15

14:30 – 16:00 Renishaw booth 3.1-E68
Wednesday

Nov. 15

13:00 – 14:30 TRUMPFT Booth 3.0-E50
Thursday

Nov.16

 14:00 – 14:30 SLM Solutions Booth 3.0-E70
Thursday

Nov.16

 15:00 – 15:30 Impact Innovations booth 3.0-A50
Thursday

Nov.16

 15:00 – 15:30 BeAM booth 3.0-B40
Nov. 17 10:00 – 10:30 Formnext EOS booth 3.1-G50

Metal 3D printing for the operating room

From preoperative planning to patient education to surgical guide production, 3D printing for medical applications is on the rise as physicians and researchers are increasingly taking advantage of the technology’s endless flexibility. A new generation of metal 3D printing technology along with biocompatible metals are adding yet another layer of possibilities, allowing medical implant companies to 3D print patient-specific implants for immediate use in a fraction of the time of traditional methods.

German medical device manufacturer Emerging Implant Technologies (EIT), the first European orthopaedic implant maker to focus solely on manufacturing with 3D printing, recently demonstrated the vast potential of medical additive manufacturing by supplying the first anatomically adapted, 3D-printed titanium fusion implant to a patient with a degenerative cervical spine condition. The technology behind this pioneering effort was 3D Systems’ Direct Metal Printing (DMP) technology, which is capable of building metal objects layer by layer in a variety of metals, in this case biocompatible titanium.

Designed in partnership with 3D Systems and produced using its cloud-based manufacturing services, the porous EIT cervical implant imitates the structure and characteristics of natural trabecular bone, say the developers, allowing the surrounding structures to fuse with it more easily and significantly accelerating the healing process. This sophisticated medical device—with its precise micro-, macro- and nano-structural components—demonstrates the power and potential of infinitely complex 3D printed parts and the incredible accuracy of DMP technology.

The capabilities of DMP, and medical applications like EIT’s, are already capturing the medical community’s attention. “We are fascinated by the possibilities of this new technology combining modern computer-aided design and custom-made manufacturing of a high-tech cervical implant,” said Uwe Spetzger, the surgeon who performed the surgery, and the chairman of the neurosurgery department at Klinikum Karlsruhe, in a press release. “The future of patient individualised spinal implants has begun.”

Typically, a cervical implant procedure requires bone grafts as well as stock metal implants and comes with a range of undesired outcomes, like implant migration and breakage. As a result, many patients require subsequent operations before the implant can be secured. EIT’s implant, on the other hand, nullifies the need for bone grafts and, with its bone-like structure, provides enhanced bone-implant contact and fusion. At the same time, using patient-specific imaging data and 3D printing, EIT is able to provide implants that fit perfectly with the patient’s anatomy and produce those implants faster and more economically than traditional methods. These custom-fit implants reduce the chance of migrating and actually encourage the bone-implant fusion that is so vital to the success of this procedure. For the patient, this all translates into less time under anaesthesia because no bone grafts are required, a reduced risk of re-operation due to migrated implants and, potentially, a faster recovery.

Used increasingly in medical applications, as well as automotive, aerospace and manufacturing, Direct Metal 3D printers by 3D Systems create chemically pure, fully dense and highly accurate metal parts using patented laser melting technology. In addition to the biocompatible titanium used by EIT, DMP printers are compatible with over 20 materials, like Inconel, maraging steel and chromium cobalt.

As medical manufacturers shift toward personalised and highly complex implants and drill guides, the future is bright for 3D Systems’ Direct Metal 3D printing.

SOURCE – Rapid News Publications Ltd

Canada Makes announces new leadership partnership with Precision ADM

Precision ADM 3D printed heat exchanger

Precision ADM 3D-printed heat exchanger

May 4, 2015 – Canada Makes is proud to announce a new partnership with Precision ADM, a division of the Orthopaedic Innovation Centre (OIC) focused on advanced digital manufacturing for medical and aerospace applications. Winnipeg-based Precision ADM will function as a leading member in the Canada Makes network, which is dedicated to promoting the adoption and development of additive manufacturing (AM) in Canada.  “We are pleased to welcome Precision ADM into the Canada Makes community,” said Martin Lavoie, Canadian Manufacturers & Exporters’ (CME) director of policy for manufacturing competitiveness and innovation. Precision ADM“As Canada’s advanced manufacturing sector evolves it is vital that we connect industry leaders like Precision ADM with other leaders in the AM field.” Medical and aerospace sectors represent some of the highest market potential for the adoption of additive manufacturing, meaning a partnership between Canada Makes and Precision ADM will accelerate Canada’s implementation and commercialization of additively manufactured products. “Additive manufacturing allows engineers and surgeons at OIC to design medical devices that will allow for patient specific solutions in ways that were not possible with conventional manufacturing methods,” said Martin Petrak, president and CEO of OIC Inc. Canada Makes recently sat down with Dale Kellington, VP of Product Development at Precision ADM, for a Q&A session:

Dale Kellington

Dale Kellington, VP Business Development at Precision ADM

Tell us about Precision ADM and the organization’s mandate and vision. Precision ADM, Advanced Digital Manufacturing, is a place where knowledge and understanding ofthe large variety of additive manufacturing (AM) technologies exists.  We understand which AM technology is best for a given application, along with what post processing will be needed to achieve a final, functional end product. With a strong focus on metal and polymer AM parts for medical and aerospace applications, Precision ADM endeavours to find the two-part design and manufacturing solution that best meets the material, quantity, quality, and cost characteristics required for a given specific application. Our vision is for a strong group of small and medium-sized enterprises (SMEs) to start up in Canada where AM is the manufacturing method that gives them the strategic ability to meet niche market needs in a highly flexible and profitable manner.  These companies can focus on market research and product requirements while we help them achieve the requirements through AM design and manufacturing. How does Precision ADM fit into the Canada Makes network? Canada Makes provides the national network to assist startups and SMEs to develop and manufacture their products using AM.  Precision ADM will be a vital part of this network by partnering with companies that are ready to go past the prototype. We can help guide them through product design and development toward a manufacturing solution that allows them to create a profitable and flexible company. What role do you see Precision ADM playing in the medical and aerospace sectors? How will that role evolve in the future? When it comes to manufacturing high-value, high-requirement medical or aerospace parts with metal or polymer AM you need a team of experts available to make the metallurgy and mechanical characteristics acceptable and reproducible, to understand the regulatory environment of the end products with respect to AM, and to scale manufacturing production as the product market penetration grows. Precision ADM will provide this team to startup and SME organizations within the Canada Makes network so that the organization can use their initial investment towards market research and penetration activities that will make them healthy in the long term. Experts believe the market for AM will grow to $21 billion USD by 2020 from $4.1 billion USD in 2014.  As this happens, Precision ADM wants to ensure that Canada is equipped to capture its market share in areas that offer the highest return on investment through scaling our application knowledge and manufacturing capabilities. How will the growth of Canadian advanced manufacturing benefit Precision ADM and vice versa? By helping to grow a large group of healthy, profitable companies with a variety of AM end-use products developed and manufactured in Canada, the application knowledge and IP developed will ensure that Canada and Precision ADM are at the forefront of innovation.  Growth in this sector will mean an ever increasing array of opportunities to capitalize on as the nature of product design and manufacturing changes over the coming decades.

Canada Makes is a network of private, public, academic, and non-profit entities involved in advanced and additive manufacturing. For more information on partnerships and initiatives visit www.canadamakes.ca. For more information on Precision ADM visit www.precisionadm.com.