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Canada Makes’ Metal Additive Demonstration Program to successfully conclude

Canada Makes will soon successfully conclude the forth round of its Metal Additive Demonstration Program. The program is well on its way to completing 60 projects this year through the engagement of 100 companies all interested in metal additive manufacturing (AM). Proving once again how very popular this program is with large and small companies from across the country.

The Metal Additive Demonstration Program, delivered by Canada Makes with funding from NRC-IRAP, has a goal to help Canadian companies increase their awareness and assist in understanding the various advantages metal AM technologies offer.

“I am proud to say that we have done projects with companies from all provinces and even one territory,” said Frank Defalco, Manager Canada Makes. “Canada Makes has helped bring to life several AM applications in a variety of sectors and I know we will continue working with companies to deliver innovative ideas that will help shape the future of manufacturing.”

How the Metal Additive Demonstration Program works?
Canada Makes assists in assessing the needs of manufacturers and how best AM can fit into their business model. Some have needs like the fabrication of obsolete legacy parts no longer available, AM offers a relatively inexpensive solution. Others are tooling companies looking to improve productivity and gaining a competitive edge by adopting conformal cooling.

Canada Makes then introduces eligible companies projects to leading Canadian service providers of metal AM technologies who form the working group for delivery of parts. Hailing from different parts of the country, these experts provide participating companies advice and guidance on the design of a part as well as the opportunities in adopting AM to their process.

One of the primary goals of the program is for Canada’s industry to learn about the cost savings associated with AM, and how best they can take advantage of the main areas where AM excels at; light-weighting of parts, parts consolidation and complexity of design, the sweet-spots for metal AM.

“Certain parts do not make sense to use additive manufacturing for, not all problems can be solved through 3D printing but plenty can,” added Defalco. “It is knowing were to use this powerful new tool and that is what we are trying to do with this program.”

Be they SMEs or larger corporations, AM is changing how we build things and this program is there to help them learn about the disruptions coming to their sector but also de-risks their initial trials of this exciting technology. The results will create awareness and encourage the adoption of AM technology, thus improving Canada’s manufacturing and exporting sectors and our global competitiveness, resulting in new technology skills and increased employment opportunities in Canada.

Onstream-PIG

Onstream Pipeline Inspection Gauge (PIG)

Since the start of the program, late 2014, Canada Makes engaged with over 200 Canadian companies and over this time we reported on some of the successful projects. Here are some of the successful projects reported on over the past few years. Starting with the recent article The future of manufacturing for the energy sector is being redefined, Onstream’s Director of Technology Stephen Westwood said this about their experience with the program. “Whilst 3D printing is almost competitive on existing parts the benefits are truly reaped when designing new parts. The hard part becomes letting go of your prejudices regarding what can and can not be made based on years of experiences with machining.”

spinner/impeller

spinner/impeller

Metal Additive Manufacturing (AM) Demonstration program completes first project
Back in 2015, Burloak Technologies completed the first project of the program, a spinner/impeller to be used in a production-logging tool to measure flow. For optimum efficiency it is important the part is as light as possible allowing an quicker change of speed when a change of flow is detected. As well the part needs to be chemical resistant to improve corrosion resistance to the well fluid encountered in hostile environments.

Design improved “Venturi Cup” for Melet Plastics

Precision ADM, Melet Plastics & Canada Makes partner on conformal cooling project
Precision ADM recently completed a conformal cooling mold project that developed an improved “Venturi Cup” for Melet Plastics. One of the major factors contributing to the deformation of molded plastic parts is a lack of uniform heat distribution throughout molds. Various areas of the final part created by a mold cool at different rates creating internal stresses and deformations.

MDA spacecraft interface brackets for an antenna

Canada Makes, Fusia & MDA team up for space-bound part 
Various satellite manufacturers are using additive manufacturing to reduce the cost and time required to build spacecraft parts. 3D printing offers new possibilities for manufacturers of satellites. The building of parts with additive manufacturing allows new capabilities not available using conventional manufacturing, although it can be expensive and difficult so it is crucial to use the technology correctly where it offers true benefits. The parts are spacecraft interface brackets for an antenna and been optimised for a flight project.

Procter & Gamble Stainless Steel AM part

P&G and AMM partner with Canada Makes’ Metal Additive Demonstration Program
Procter & Gamble Belleville Plant partnered with Additive Metal Manufacturing Inc. (AMM) and Canada Makes to explore building new customized parts using additive manufacturing (AM). The example piece of work is printed to serve the combined purposes to deliver fluid to designated locations with the four extended legs while minimizing disturbance to the flow that it merges in. The vast metallurgy choices also provide a wide spectrum of chemical/environmental resistance. This illustrated part was printed in Stainless Steel taking advantage of its good anti-corrosion performance. 

Small to medium-sized enterprises (SMEs) form the majority of the businesses participating in the program. Under the current challenging economic conditions and with strong competition from low-cost countries, SMEs are interested in adapting advanced manufacturing technologies, such as additive manufacturing, to improve their competitiveness. NRC-IRAP’s financial support enables Canada Makes to work with these SMEs to organize projects and build momentum in Canada, allowing companies to see the advantages of AM technologies and improve the performance of our manufacturers to compete globally.

Canada Makes intends to continue offering this program if the powers that be agree. We hope to confirm this in the coming weeks, so be sure to keep returning to Canada Makes’ website or subscribe to our newsletter (see home page to subscribe) and stay informed about Canada’s AM sector.

Through the delivery of the program, it quickly became apparent that newcomers engaged to participate in this emerging technology shared many of the same questions and concerns. Therefore, Canada Makes developed, with its partners, two interactive guides the Metal Additive Process Guide & Metal Additive Design Guide designed to assist businesses new to metal AM who want to learn about process and designing for metal AM. The Guides are easy to use, interactive and offer useful information for the adoption of this technology.

Access is free although we request that you register. Thank you and enjoy!

Metal Additive Design GuideMetal Additive Process Guide

If you are interested in the program, please contact
Frank Defalco
frank.defalco@cme-mec.ca
(613) 875-1674

P&G and AMM partner with Canada Makes’ Metal Additive Demonstration Program

Procter & Gamble Belleville Plant partnered with Additive Metal Manufacturing Inc. (AMM) and Canada Makes to explore building new customized parts using additive manufacturing (AM). The project was funded through Canada Makes’ Metal Additive Demonstration Program.

“Parts can be very difficult even impossible to make with traditional subtractive machining processes,” said Haixia Jin, FullSizeRenderP&G Engineering Technical Manager. “Metal 3D printing offers an exciting alternative to commercial off-the-shelf parts that cannot achieve complicated design requirements or internal cavity geometry. Even in cases where commercial customization is available and able, it usually comes with significant additional cost or an unbearable long lead-time.”

The example piece of work is printed to serve the combined purposes to deliver fluid to designated locations with the four extended legs while minimizing disturbance to the flow that it merges in. The vast metallurgy choices also provide a wide spectrum of chemical/environmental resistance. This illustrated part was printed in Stainless Steel taking advantage of its good anti-corrosion performance.

“AMM is delighted to be partnering with P&G and Canada Makes in assisting P&G introduce 3D METAL printing into their supply chain,” said Norman Holesh, President AMM. “P&G embarked on this journey with the full understanding that to be successful, the technology must be embraced as early as possible in the design stage. This technology is neither an alternative to subtractive manufacturing nor a replacement for it but an addition to the entire manufacturing process and allows for previously unthinkable designs and a dramatic reduction in lead times.”

IMG_6928“Design rules have changed and AMM works with its customers to help them understand and embrace these changes and take full advantage of design freedom,” added Holesh

“Designing and building complex parts as well as the lead-time saved are two big advantages that AM offers users of the technology. This project certainly was an excellent example offered through Canada Makes’ Metal Additive Demonstration Program,” stated Frank Defalco Manager Canada Makes. “Canada Makes will continue to partner with Canadian companies looking to the advantages offered by having additive manufacturing as a powerful new option in creating parts previously unfeasible.”

About AMM

Advanced Manufacturing Canada
Additive Metal Manufacturing Inc. is a full-service 3D METAL printing bureau located in Toronto and assists its customers understand the additive journey from design all the way to finished printed component parts. AMM is a progressive, productive and respected leader providing integrated and advanced manufacturing technology solutions within the emerging market for AM ensuring their industrial partners have the best opportunity to excel and Take Back Manufacturing for Canada. AMM is certified with both ISO 9001 and for Controlled Goods. www.additivemet.com

About Procter & Gamble Belleville Plant
Opened in 1975, the Belleville, Ontario site now produces Always and Olay products for North America and the globe.

  • In 1984, the Belleville site started manufacturing Always feminine care products
  • The site currently manufactures the entire line of Always products, including pads, liners, Always Infinity and Always Discreet, as well as Olay Daily Facials
  • Since 2010, the site has received a prestigious manufacturing excellence award, the highest recognition among P&G manufacturing facilities

To celebrate their 40th anniversary, the site set a Guinness World Record for the largest game of “Follow the Leader” in the world.

The Metal Additive Manufacturing Demonstration Program is funded by NRC-IRAP and is designed to help Canadian industries increase awareness and assist in understanding the advantages of the metal additive manufacturing (AM) technology. Canada Makes works with a group of AM experts who provide participating companies guidance of the advantages and business opportunities in terms of cost savings and efficiencies of AM.

About Canada Makes
A Canadian Manufacturers & Exporters (CME) initiative, Canada Makes is a network of private, public, academic, and non-profit entities dedicated to promoting the adoption and development of additive manufacturing in Canada. For more information on Canada Makes, please visit www.canadamakes.ca

Media contact:
Frank Defalco at frank.defalco@cme-mec.ca

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Canada Makes, Fusia & MDA team up for space-bound part

Canada Makes, FusiA and MacDonald, Dettwiler and Associates Ltd. (MDA) partnered to build a part to be launched into to space later this year. Additive manufacturing projects like this highlight how the technology is rapidly changing the economics of space. Canada Makes helped with funding through its Metal Additive Demonstration program supported by NRC-IRAP, MDA designed the part and FusiA built it.

“We are accelerating our adoption of additive manufacturing for space,” says Joanna Boshouwers, MDA’s Vice President and General Manager. “The FusiA built part shown will be tested structurally in order to qualify the rest of the batch to fly in space. The support MDA received by Canada Makes’ program has proved to be valuable, allowing us to explore more complex parts produced with this technique.”

“Canada Makes primary goal is to reinforce Canada’s additive manufacturing supply chain and this project is a big step in that direction,” said Frank Defalco, Manager Canada Makes. “This is the third round we have partnered with NRC-IRAP on the Metal AM Demonstration Program, and we are very pleased that many others projects are also helping companies learn how to use additive manufacturing to innovate.”

MDA-Fusia-part

Spacecraft interface bracket for an antenna

The parts are spacecraft interface brackets for an antenna and been optimised for a flight project.

Various satellite manufacturers are using additive manufacturing to reduce the cost and time required to build spacecraft parts. Boeing recently announced they will begin incorporating the technology, another recent announcement from Poland that they will use 3D printing to develop the country’s first satellites.

3D printing offers new possibilities for manufacturers of satellites. The building of parts with additive manufacturing allows new capabilities not available using conventional manufacturing, although it can be expensive and difficult so it is crucial to use the technology correctly where it offers true benefits.

The Metal Additive Manufacturing Demonstration Program is delivered by Canada Makes through funding by NRC-IRAP. The program is designed to help Canadian industries increase awareness and assist in understanding the advantages of the metal additive manufacturing (AM) technology. Canada Makes works with a group of AM experts who provide participating companies guidance of the advantages and business opportunities in terms of cost savings and efficiencies of AM.

About MDA
MDA is a global communications and information company providing operational solutions to commercial and government organizations worldwide.

MDA’s business is focused on markets and customers with strong repeat business potential, primarily in the Communications sector and the Surveillance and Intelligence sector. In addition, the Company conducts a significant amount of advanced technology development.

MDA’s established global customer base is served by more than 4,800 employees operating from 15 locations in the United States, Canada, and internationally. www.mdacorporation.com

About FusiA
With more than 40 years of expertise, FusiA Impression 3D Metal Inc specializes in metal additive manufacturing (3D printing) of precision metal parts for the aerospace, space and defense and they have been a key partner for research and development projects of aeronautics for the past five years. www.fusia.fr

About Canada Makes
A Canadian Manufacturers & Exporters (CME) initiative,  Canada Makes is a network of private, public, academic, and non-profit entities dedicated to promoting the adoption and development of additive manufacturing in Canada. For more information on Canada Makes, please visit www.canadamakes.ca or contact Frank Defalco at frank.defalco@cme-mec.ca

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